c# barcode creator Figure 12-8: The Microsoft ToolBox. in C#

Creating QR in C# Figure 12-8: The Microsoft ToolBox.

Figure 12-8: The Microsoft ToolBox.
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Summary
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One of the qualities I've noticed in great testers is that they are extremely efficient in their testing. They are not hurried in their testing activities; rather they all seem to know exactly the point where software can help solve their current testing problem faster than their brain can. When software is a potential solution for their current situation, they are able to find or repurpose an existing tool to their needs or, when necessary, create a new tool to solve a problem. Testers need to use new tools when appropriate and reexamine their current toolbox periodically to be most effective. As is the case with source code management, testers should also examine their toolset and determine whether existing tools can be used in a different way. An adequately filled toolbox, along with the skill and knowledge to use those tools, is one of the biggest assets a tester can have.
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13: Customer Feedback Systems
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Alan Page A big piece of the quality puzzle is the customer. Software companies such as Microsoft write software for people software that can help people be more productive or accomplish tasks they wouldn't be able to do otherwise. This chapter discusses the tools and techniques Microsoft uses to gather data from our customers and partners to help us improve the quality of our products and to influence our testing.
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Testing and Quality
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I hope this isn't a shock, but customers don't really care about testing. At some level, I suppose they care that some effort went into testing the product before they spent money on it, but they're not at all concerned with most of the actual work that testers do. Imagine that you are browsing for software at a store and pick up a box to read the bullet points on the side describing its features: Ran more than 9,000 test cases with a 98 percent pass rate. Code coverage numbers over 85 percent! Stress tested nightly. Nearly 5,000 bugs found. More than 3,000 bugs fixed!
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Tested with both a black box and white box approach. And much, much more Those bullet points are all interesting to the engineering team, but the customer doesn't care about any of them. Customers only care if the product solves a problem for them and works in the way they expect. If you consider software quality to be the value it provides to the user, most test activities don't directly improve software quality. Despite this, testing is indeed valuable (or I wouldn't be writing this book). So, what does testing do
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Testing Provides Information
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The bullet points mentioned previously provide information about the testing activity and, in some cases, the status of the product. This information is critical in assessing progress and identifying risk. For example, if the latest report from the test team says that they have run half of their tests and have found 40 critical "severity 1" bugs, that relates a different risk metric than if test tells you they've run all of their tests and found only 1 critical bug. Of course, this is not enough information either you would want to know what types of tests were done, which scenarios were tested, which areas of the product they had tested, how many noncritical bugs were found, and dozens of other points of data. I've never liked the idea of test being the gatekeepers of quality. Rather, I like to think that the information that testing provides helps the product's decision makers make the right decisions regarding schedule and risks.
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Quality Perception
If everything goes perfectly, the work that the test team does increases quality by decreasing risk. In reality, this doesn't always happen. Too often, the information provided by the test team is not reflective of the way customers will actually use the product. You can think of test data and customer-perceived quality (I like to call this experience quality) as two related but distinct spheres of data relating to quality:
If our test information were perfect, we would be able to predict the experience quality that our customers will have that is, at the time of release, we would know within a few points what the customer satisfaction numbers would be when we survey customers six months later. Our two spheres of quality would nearly overlap:
Most of the time, these circles intersect, but rarely quite as much as we hope:
Microsoft is working hard to get experience quality and test data to match by finding more measurements that can predict how customers will perceive quality. Data that shows how the customers are using a product, where it is failing them, and what they like and dislike about the product is invaluable in developing quality software. One of the big problems many of Microsoft's large software projects face when gathering customer data is processing all of the diverse sets of data in a way that accurately reflects the diversity of needs of the customer base. Product support data, e-mail, customer surveys, and usability studies all provide valuable information, but it can be difficult to prioritize the feedback and understand the scenarios surrounding these data points, as depicted in Figure 13-1. Moreover, we discovered that often the data from various sources didn't agree, was subjective, and we frequently couldn't process and comprehend all of the data.
Figure 13-1: Customer feedback. There are many ways to find and collect information and feedback from customers. This chapter discusses four methods in use across most product teams: Customer Experience Improvement Program (CEIP), Windows Error Reporting (WER), Send a Smile, and Connect. Many of these tools are available to our partners and Microsoft corporate customers.
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