vb.net code 39 barcode Securing Server Roles in .NET

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Securing Server Roles
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see the document entitled Extending the Security Configuration Wizard, available at http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx FamilyID=903fd496-9eb9-4a45-aa003f2f20fd6171&DisplayLang=en.
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Figure 11-9 After SCW has analyzed your computer you can view the configuration database to see what it found.
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Figure 11-10 Each section of SCW is preceded by a page explaining what you do in that section.
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Figure 11-11 In SCW you select the roles you want your server to support.
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After roles configuration, you get to select the client features you want to support. The feature set is similar but not identical to that in the Add Features wizard we saw before, and there are fewer features in the set. Again, the metaphors do not transfer cleanly, and SCW can be extended. As we can see in Figure 11-12, a feature in SCW is something the computer does to act as a client, while a role is something it does to act as a server. This is different from the metaphor used in the other tools where a role is a collection of services and features that can be thought of as a unit and a feature is something that supports roles. The two metaphors and the two different uses of the same terms are bound to confuse people. Normally, you will have the right set of roles selected already in Figure 11-11. Verify that the analysis found what you think it should find. If it did not, check whether the role has been installed, and install it if it is missing before you rerun SCW. If you make a mistake it is not the end of the world. SCWs rollback feature will bring you back to where you started by undoing the changes the policy made. When you click Next on the Client Features page in SCW, you get to pick Administration And Other Options, as shown in Figure 11-13. An option in SCW is something that does not neatly fit into either a role or a feature. It may provide administrative support, or it may just be a single service, such as the Interactive Services Detection. Again, most of the default options should be correct here. It is worth pointing out the drop-down menu, too. It will be populated with options relevant to the roles and features you selected earlier and will be different on different computers.
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Securing Server Roles
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Figure 11-12 In SCW, a feature is a client feature.
Figure 11-13 Other services and features are in the Administration and Other Options page in SCW.
Finally, you get the Additional Services page, shown in Figure 11-14. Although SCW ships with a very large database of services, not everything is described in that database. Those services that SCW finds on a computer and that are not described in the database are shown on the Additional Services page. As shown in Figure 11-14, you see three
Part III:
Common Security Scenarios
built-in services. This screenshot was taken on a beta version of Windows Server 2008. By the time the product ships, all built-in services should be described and, unless you have some third-party service installed, you should not see this page at all.
Figure 11-14 The Additional Services page shows services that are not described in the SCW database.
On the next page you get to select what you do with services that you are not configuring. This option is only interesting if you take the policy you are creating and apply it to a different computer. If that computer has different services than the one you created the policy on, SCW needs to know what to do with them. One option is to leave them alone, which is the default. The other option is to disable them, which is more secure, but may break things. If you follow the advice of only applying policies to servers that are identical to the one you created them on, your choice on this page will be irrelevant. Finally, you are finished with the Roles Configuration portion of SCW and the wizard tells you what you did. As you can see from Figure 11-15, even if you just click right through you will significantly affect the attack surface of the computer. For instance, because this computer is not a Print Server, and it has no printers installed, you have no reason to install the Print Spooler service. SCW disables all services that are not necessary. On our test server SCW disables 17 services that were set to automatic start and sets 42 manual start services to disabled. Your results will obviously vary depending on how your server is configured but, clearly, SCW enables you to relatively easily tailor a policy to your specific and unique servers. You will now move on to, arguably, the most important section of SCW: Networking. After the initial welcome page, you see Figure 11-16, which contains a list of all the firewall rules SCW proposes. The rules proposed are based on the role support you selected in the prior pages. If no further configuration is made in the Network section, SCW will build firewall rules that
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