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Step 1: Create a Classification Scheme
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The first step in building a server isolation strategy is to classify systems. You can think of network protection mechanisms as residing on a spectrum. Take, for instance, administrative accounts. One extreme of the spectrum is using one account for all purposes, on all computers, by all administrators. On the other extreme you have one account per administrator per task, with the least possible privileges necessary to complete that task per computer. While the former example might be practically possible, it would violate more security principles than we can list. The latter example, while highly secure, is intractable to manage and so cumbersome to use that it will likely be ignored by everyone involved. A similar spectrum exists for all other techniques. For instance, in terms of restricting communications, you can certainly analyze every single computer and restrict access to each one based on exactly what you need to use it for. However, in a network with many thousands of computers, this is virtually impossible. You would be hacked long before you completed the analysis. A far better option is to create a classification scheme. This scheme can be as simple or as complex as you need it to be. The idea is to divide your computers into categories that make sense to your business. Classifications can take many forms. In a military establishment it is common to have a two-dimensional classification scheme, such as that shown in Table 13-1. The military-style classification can be converted to classifying computers quite easily. One variant is shown in Table 13-2. Table 13-2 shows a subset of a computer classification based on the role the systems are fulfilling. No matter how you create your classifications, you almost certainly want to base them on
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the role the computer is fulfilling. The more granular you make the classification scheme that is, the closer to a single role you can get the more secure the resulting implementation will be. However, don t go overboard with this classification. First, you will probably need to revise it once you start analyzing your network and realize that you missed something and that some roles that do not clearly make sense. Second, treat this as a risk management effort. If you are designing a classification scheme for an extreme risk environment, you want more granularity. If you are in a low-risk environment, you may be fine with a coarser system.
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Table 13-1 Military Classification Scheme Class Unclassified Compartment Secret Top Secret Compartment 1 Compartment 2 Compartment 3 Table 13-2 System Classification by Role Class Public Compartment Kiosks Infrastructure Servers Workstations Information Worker Workstations Server Domain Controllers
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You may have noticed that one potential problem with using the two-dimensional classification system based on the military scheme is that you cannot neatly take into account the data that a particular computer of a given type is processing as well as the server type. For instance, not all database servers are alike. Some process highly sensitive personal information such as national ID numbers. Others hold public information, such as Web pages, that can be read by all users but written only by a few. Yet others servers may be entirely public and used simply as centralized temp folders. You can add rows to the classification for each computer type, but because many of the parameters you need to apply to computers are similar within a major type, this is not the cleanest method. One way to accommodate sub-typing of computers a bit more neatly is to use a different modeling method. I like the organizational chart metaphor. It is infinitely extensible and permits easy sub-typing. You can, of course, use a more complicated modeling scheme, but because I find parsimony in your metaphor to be far more valuable than having hundreds of modeling constructs available, I tend to use simple modeling schemes. Using an org chart metaphor, we might come up with a picture such as the one in Figure 13-5.
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