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Figure 13-5 An org chart style classification system is useful for complex environments where a lot of sub-types are needed to adequately express the security needs of the computers.
13:
Securing the Network
As Figure 13-5 shows, an org chart style classification model can get rather large very quickly. Therefore, it might not be right for all environments. Note also that many of the categories are unlikely to have any computers in them. For instance, while Servers is a useful abstract super class, no computers should be assigned to it. All of them should be part of some specialization. However, when discussing server roles, as we did in 11, Securing Server Roles, this type of hierarchical designation can be extremely valuable. Once you have a preliminary classification model to start evaluating for fitness, you can begin your analysis. A useful technique for the analysis portion of the task is Network Threat Modeling, first described in Protect Your Windows Network.
Steps 2 and 3: Network Threat Modeling
The next step is to see how well your classification model maps to the actual computers in your network. If you do not already have a map of your network, build one. It should detail everything important on your network, although you may group identical things together. The objective is to have something that lets you understand what your network looks like. Figure 13-6 provides an example. The next step is to start applying the classification scheme to the network map. As you have already noticed, Figure 13-6 is based on the physical design of the network, with each site shown separately, and with the same type of server in multiple sites. In Network Threat Modeling we are really not interested in the individual servers. Our objective is to understand the types of computers, not the individual computers. To that end, we take our classification scheme and overlay it on our network map. This will probably cause us to lose the distinction between sites. However, if the security needs of similar computer types are the same across sites, we have achieved exactly what we want to achieve. At this stage in the process we are trying to create a higher level of abstraction in our understanding of the network. This should result in a picture similar to Figure 13-7. Figure 13-7 classifies computers into types based on our classification. Note that we have a new type of computer that did not appear before: the Human Resources (HR) Personnel Workstation. In this enterprise, we decided that because HR personnel have access to sensitive data on every employee, we needed to apply special security to their computers. Only some members of the client operations team that administers clients will have access to these computers. This prevents all client operations employees from having indirect access to personnel Personally Identifiable Information (PII). When you have a classification scheme you have achieved a large portion of the objective of Network Threat Modeling. You should now be able to assign sensitivity labels to the various computer types. These labels are based on the types of data stored on that computer and the type of access to other computers you have if you successfully attack that computer. I have used numeric labels here, although you can use whatever makes sense. DCs, obviously, are the most sensitive computers of all. Therefore, they have a sensitivity label of 10. By itself the number means nothing. It is just a way to relate one computer type to another. Workstations, because they are used by the largest proportion of users and at the
Part III:
Common Security Scenarios
highest risk, should be the least sensitive computers in the network. That does not mean that they are the least likely to be attacked. On the contrary, they are probably the most likely to be attacked. Therefore, they should be the least sensitive in other words, the ones that give you access to the least amount of information in the network.
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