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Table 512. Output of Solution to Separating Elements Problem that "Seems" Correct
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arrid value A A A A 20 22 25 25
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Set Operations
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You can think of joins as horizontal operations between tables, generating a virtual table that contains columns from both tables. This section covers vertical operations between tables, including UNION, EXCEPT, and INTERSECT. Any mention of set operations in this section refers to these vertical operations. A set operation accepts two tables as inputs, each resulting from a query specification. For simplicity's sake, I'll just use the term inputs in this section to describe the input tables of the set operations. UNION returns the unified set of rows from both inputs, EXCEPT returns the rows that appear in the first input but not the second, and INTERSECT returns rows that are common to both inputs. ANSI SQL:1999 defines native operators for all three set operations, each with two nuances: one optionally followed by DISTINCT (the default) and one followed by ALL. SQL Server 2000 supported only two of these set operators, UNION and UNION ALL. SQL Server 2005 added native support for the set operators EXCEPT and INTERSECT. Currently, SQL Server does not support the optional use of DISTINCT for set operations. This is not a functional limitation because DISTINCT is implied when you don't specify ALL. I will discuss solutions to all set operations, with both nuances, in both versions. Like joins, these set operations always operate on only two inputs, generating a virtual table as the result. You might feel comfortable calling the input tables left and right as with joins, or you might feel more comfortable referring to them as the first and second input tables. Before I describe each set operation in detail, let's get a few technicalities regarding how set operations work out of the way. The two inputs must have the same number of columns, and corresponding columns must have the same datatype, or at least be implicitly convertible. The column names of the result are determined by the first input. An ORDER BY clause is not allowed in the individual table expressions. All other logical processing phases (joins, filtering, grouping, and so on) are supported on the individual queries except the TOP option. Conversely, ORDER BY is the only logical processing phase supported directly on the final result of a set operation. If you specify an ORDER BY clause at the end of the query, it will be applied to the final result set. None of the other logical processing phases are allowed directly on the result of a set operation. I will provide alternatives later in the chapter. Set operations work on complete rows from the two input tables. Note that when comparing rows between the inputs, set operations treat NULLs as equal, just like identical known values. In this regard, set operations are not like query filters (ON, WHERE, HAVING), which as you recall do not treat NULLs as equal.
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UNION
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UNION generates a result set combining the rows from both inputs. The following sections describe
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the differences between UNION (implicit DISTINCT) and UNION ALL.
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UNION DISTINCT
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Specifying UNION without the ALL option combines the rows from both inputs and applies a DISTINCT on top (in other words, removes duplicate rows). For example, the following query returns all occurrences of Country, Region, City that appear in either the Employees table or the Customers table, with duplicate rows removed: USE Northwind; SELECT Country, Region, City FROM dbo.Employees UNION SELECT Country, Region, City FROM dbo.Customers;
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The query returns 71 unique rows.
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UNION ALL
You can think of UNION ALL as UNION without duplicate removal. That is, you get one result set containing all rows from both inputs, including duplicates. For example, the following query returns all occurrences of Customer, Region, City from both tables: SELECT Country, Region, City FROM dbo.Employees UNION ALL SELECT Country, Region, City FROM dbo.Customers;
Because the Employees table has 9 rows and the Customers table has 91 rows, you get a result set with 100 rows.
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