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As with customizable compilers, if you want to configure linkers you must be doing some complex native code. One of the example build files that comes with the task is designed to build the C++ version of Xerces, showing that you can build a very complex C++ project in a single build file.
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Remember how we had to set the java.library.path property to the directory containing our JNI library before running the JVM If you are distributing code you need to do the same in any <java> calls that run JNI programs, or any shell scripts that start the programs. When trying to integrate native libraries with a web application, you need either to modify the application server s own startup properties or get the library into the execution path. An Ant-based install script could copy the library into place, just as our deploy target did. However you do it, you should shut down the application server first, to ensure that Ant can overwrite any existing version of library, and that the application server will reload the new library. For client-side code, applets cannot download native libraries for security reasons. Java Web Start does let end users download and run native libraries, and is smart enough to download the appropriate libraries for the client platform. Java Web Start A good way to redistribute native libraries with Java applications is to use Java Web Start. This is because it will download whatever native libraries a signed Web Start application declares that it needs. There is no built-in support for Java Web Start in Ant, but this is corrected by the Venus Application Publisher Vamp product family (http://www.vamphq.com). Along with their publisher toolset comes a couple of Ant tasks for Web Start code delivery. One of these tasks, <vampwar>, builds a WAR file containing a web application comprised of the application you wish to distribute and the servlet you need to enable Web Start clients to download your application using the JNLP wire protocol. The task will even sign the downloadable JAR files if you provide it with the right information. This means that the task can take your code and other resources, and generate a ready-to-go web application to deliver to end users. You just need to get that web application to the server, which is the classic deployment problem for Ant to solve. You are still going to have to learn about Java Web Start and JNLP from the SDK documentation, and invest time getting your JNLP descriptors right, but the mundane steps of altering your web application to support JNLP and then setting up all the build process steps to package up your application are handled for you by the Vamp tasks.
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Writing native code to integrate with Java is a complex process, especially once you go cross-platform. You could drop down to an IDE or Make, but these bring with them all their inherent problems inherent in these tools, problems that Ant fixed for pure Java code some time ago. If you resort to external build tools for the native code sections, you make your build more complex and less portable than it needs to be. The <cc> task, available as a download from http://sf.net/projects/ant-contrib, is the key to compiling native code in Ant. In one single declaration, you can compile and link a directory tree full of C or C++ source, creating your application library. It may seem complex, with the <compiler> and <linker> elements to configure the stages of the build, and the <libset>, <defineset>, and <includespath> elements to provide input to the stages. Consider, however, what you get in return. You get to replace one or more makefiles with one or two targets in your build file. You stop having to worry about header file dependencies, and you get to integrate your C++ code with your Java build, test, and deploy process. The <cc> task is being used to build libraries or programs as part of a larger Java project, and for large, stand-alone native applications. As the task matures, more people may use Ant as a build tool for pure C++ programs because it makes sense. You can write portable build files that use the <cc> task with all of Ant s packaging and deployment facilities; build files that are easy to maintain. Who knows, the era of the makefile may be drawing to a close. You don t need to wait for that to happen to use the <cc> task. We have shown how to use it for JNI code generation, with an admittedly simple native library. Yet our build file will scale with new code; all you need to do to add new native classes is write the Java stub, the C++ implementation, and the JUnit tests, and then add the stub class to the <javah> class list. Ant build files work with C++ scale just as well as they do for Java projects.
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