vb.net barcode maker ant -Dhostname=eiger in Java

Encoder Data Matrix ECC200 in Java ant -Dhostname=eiger

ant -Dhostname=eiger
Encoding Data Matrix In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create ECC200 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Data Matrix Scanner In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The build file loads in the property files for the hostname and makes a list of which files are needed.
UCC.EAN - 128 Creator In Java
Using Barcode printer for Java Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
PDF 417 Maker In Java
Using Barcode creation for Java Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
<property name="config.file" location="${systems.dir}/${hostname}.properties"/> <property file="${config.file}" /> <property file="${systems.dir}/common.properties" /> <property name="servertype.file"
Linear Maker In Java
Using Barcode maker for Java Control to generate, create Linear 1D Barcode image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UCC.EAN - 128 Generation In Java
Using Barcode generation for Java Control to generate, create UCC-128 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER 1 8
EAN / UCC - 13 Maker In Java
Using Barcode drawer for Java Control to generate, create EAN13 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
ISSN - 13 Generation In Java
Using Barcode creator for Java Control to generate, create International Standard Serial Number image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
PRODUCTION DEPLOYMENT
Scan DataMatrix In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode reader for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Drawer In VB.NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
location="${servertypes.dir}/${target.servertype}.properties"/> <property file="${servertype.file}" /> <property name="redeploy.dir" location="dist/redeploy" /> <property name="remote.config.file" location="${remote.dir}/install-${hostname}.properties"/> <property name="remote.build.file" location="${remote.dir}/${target.servertype}.xml"/>
PDF-417 2d Barcode Printer In Java
Using Barcode maker for BIRT reports Control to generate, create PDF417 image in BIRT reports applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UCC - 12 Recognizer In Visual C#
Using Barcode recognizer for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The configuration files at build time contain more information than those we upload. In particular, they can contain passwords to the server:
Encode ANSI/AIM Code 39 In .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create Code 128 In VB.NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set A image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
target.server=eiger login.userid=tomcat4 login.password=topsecret ftp.remotedir=/home/tomcat4/install telnet.cd.directory=${ftp.remotedir} target.servertype=tomcat4.0 target.server.debug=false target.isUnix=true
Print Data Matrix ECC200 In None
Using Barcode drawer for Software Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
ECC200 Drawer In Java
Using Barcode creator for Eclipse BIRT Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
We derive some other values from these properties; the aim is to allow target systems to define them in their configuration files if necessary, such as with different FTP and telnet login accounts, or with different servers and ports for SSH-tunneled connections:
UCC - 12 Creator In None
Using Barcode generator for Software Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 2 image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Creating UPC - 13 In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPad Control to generate, create EAN13 image in iPad applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
<property <property <property <property <property <property <property <property name="ftp.server" value="${target.server}"/> name="ftp.port" value="21"/> name="telnet.server" value="${target.server}"/> name="telnet.port" value="23"/> name="ftp.userid" value="${login.userid}"/> name="ftp.password" value="${login.password}"/> name="telnet.userid" value="${login.userid}"/> name="telnet.password" value="${login.password}"/>
Make QR Code In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create QR Code 2d barcode image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Paint PDF 417 In VB.NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET framework Control to generate, create PDF417 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The build files also read in the application server-specific configuration files. These state what features are in the server:
server.isj2ee=false server.jsp.version=2.3 server.j2ee.version=0 server.xerces.needed=false
These settings can be used to control WAR file generation, either in conditional <patternset> includes of JAR files, or in the <webdoclet> task. We don t need to do this, yet, but the option is important. Obviously, these configuration files are reusable across many projects. Building a directory of upload files Based on the configuration details, Ant knows which files to upload, so it copies them to a new redeployment directory, combining the configuration files with the WAR file itself.
BUILDING A PRODUCTION DEPLOYMENT PROCESS
<target name="build-deployment-package" depends="init"> <copy todir="${redeploy.dir}" file="${warfile}"/> <copy todir="${redeploy.dir}" file="${remote.config.file}"/> <copy todir="${redeploy.dir}" file="${remote.build.file}"/> <copy todir="${redeploy.dir}" file="${remote.dir}/build.xml"/> <copy todir="${redeploy.dir}" file="${remote.dir}/common.properties"/> </target>
A local deployment can run straight from this directory; this is the simplest way to test the process. Indeed, a quick test for ${hostname} equaling ${env.HOSTNAME} lets the build file deploy this way on a local system:
<target name="install-local" depends="build-deployment-package" if="is.localhost"> <ant dir="${redeploy.dir}" inheritall="false"/> </target>
Uploading the files We will rely on the trusty <ftp> task for deployment, called three times in a row.
<target name="upload" depends="build-deployment-package" unless="is.localhost" > <echo>connecting to ${target.server} as ${ftp.userid} into ${ftp.remotedir} </echo> <ftp server="${ftp.server}" port="${ftp.port}" action="mkdir" remotedir="${ftp.remotedir}" userid="${ftp.userid}" password="${ftp.password}" verbose="true" passive="true" ignoreNoncriticalErrors="true" />
<ftp server="${ftp.server}" port="${ftp.port}" remotedir="${ftp.remotedir}" userid="${ftp.userid}" password="${ftp.password}" depends="true" verbose="true" passive="true" binary="true" ignoreNoncriticalErrors="true" > <fileset dir="${redeploy.dir}"> <include name="**/*.war"/> </fileset> </ftp>
<ftp server="${ftp.server}" port="${ftp.port}" remotedir="${ftp.remotedir}" userid="${ftp.userid}" password="${ftp.password}"
CHAPTER 1 8
PRODUCTION DEPLOYMENT
depends="true" verbose="true" passive="true" binary="false" ignoreNoncriticalErrors="true" > <fileset dir="${redeploy.dir}"> <include name="**/*.xml"/> <include name="**/*.properties"/> </fileset> </ftp> </target>
The first <ftp> call b creates the destination directory. The second uploads the WAR file c. The third one is special d; it uploads the XML and properties files in text mode, so that <telnet> can convert the line endings to those appropriate for the destination. This is not critical for the files we are currently uploading. If we added text or shell scripts, it would matter a lot. Preparing to run the remote build With the files on the remote server, it is time to run the build remotely. This is where <telnet> makes an appearance. Before calling <telnet> we need to address the different-servers-differentprompts problem, by defining the initial prompt for the different target platforms we support, and the different commands needed to reset the prompt to something under our control. If we leave them as is, with a $ or a > as the prompt, Ant may mistake program output as the prompt.
<target name="unix-prompts" if="target.isUnix"> <property name="telnet.prompt.command" value="export PS1=${telnet.prompt}"/> <property name="telnet.initial.prompt" value="$"/> </target> <target name="windows-prompts" unless="target.isUnix"> <property name="telnet.prompt.command" value="PROMPT ${telnet.prompt}"/> <property name="telnet.initial.prompt" value=">"/> </target>
If we were to support many more platforms, we would factor these settings out into platform-specific settings files, each loaded in dynamically based on a target. platform property. Now, let us deploy. Calling Ant remotely
<target name="install-remote" depends="upload,unix-prompts,windows-prompts" unless="is.localhost">
BUILDING A PRODUCTION DEPLOYMENT PROCESS
<telnet server="${telnet.server}" port="${telnet.port}" userid="${telnet.userid}" password="${telnet.password}" timeout="${telnet.timeout}" > <read string="${telnet.initial.prompt}"/> <write>${telnet.prompt.command}</write> <read string="${telnet.prompt}"/> <write>cd ${telnet.cd.directory}</write> <read string="${telnet.prompt}"/> <write>ant</write> <read string="${telnet.prompt}"/> </telnet> </target>
Set the prompt to a more complex one, such as [done] Change to the directory where the files were uploaded Call Ant
This target connects to a remote server, using a supplied username and password. We have a timeout, which must be at least as long as the maximum possible time to run the build file remotely; we choose 300 seconds for safety. Then we issue three commands down the wire For this to work, Ant must already be installed, and on the path of the account running the build. If the build fails, the local build file does not notice; it is only at test time that trouble is detected. This is why the Rant tool introduced in section 15.10 looks so promising; if it can add security and better reporting, then it will be a great way to run a remote build, not least because SOAP goes through firewalls. 18.5.8 The remote deployment in action When you actually run the build, the most surprising thing is how ordinary it is. Getting passwords right on remote systems configured with Java, Tomcat, and Ant are chores, but the build itself flies along nicely. We show a fragment of the full build in listing 18.3, omitting the preceding FTP upload, and the functional tests that follow.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.