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When setting up the release process it is useful to see what the compile options are; this is what the <echo> task in the compile target does. Downgrading the level of this message to verbose (with level="verbose") might be worthwhile once the build is working. 6.2.2 Adding data files Any complex program needs to store some data with the code: initialization and configuration files, XML files and schemas, or simply localized text messages. The ideal way to transport such static content with a JAR file is inside the file, on the classpath. It can then be retrieved using the current classloader with a call to this.getClass().getResource() or getResourceAsStream() to retrieve the data. The Java program can reference resources using a directory pattern. For example, xml/manifest.xml finds the resource in the package data below that of the package containing the class whose classloader is being loaded. Absolute references can be resolved by starting the path with a forward slash, such as /org/example/xml/manifest.xml. Alternatively, you can use the getResourceAsStream() method in the java.lang.Classloader class. If you do this, then you must not use a forward slash at the beginning of the resource name, here org/example/xml/manifest.xml. Even if the data files are in the source tree, you need to pull them in the package. You can do this in two ways. One is to copy the selected files into build/classes, the other is to import the files explicitly when creating the JAR. We recommend the first approach, as it ensures that the data is available during unit tests, and it makes it easier to verify that Ant copied the files. The mechanism for getting the files into the location is the ubiquitous <copy> task. Whenever we build, we tack in to the compile target a quick recursive copy of other file types we need.
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<copy todir="${build.dir}/classes"> <fileset dir="src" includes="**/*.properties,**/*.dtd,**/*.xml,**/*.xsd"/> </copy>
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Very old Ant versions (e.g., Ant 1.1) had a version of the <java> task that automatically copied everything it found in its source path that was not a Java file into the destination tree, pulling in data files without extra coding. This may seem like a good feature, but it tended to pull too much cruft, backup files for example, into the build file. If you come across an old build file that produces code that fails with errors about missing files, it may be expecting Ant to copy the files over implicitly; you need to add a <copy> task to fix this. Some developers keep their resources in a parallel tree to the source, because this lets them keep different configurations from different customers. Their build files have to copy in the appropriate resources for each customer when creating the customerspecific JAR file.
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Preparing documentation This is a good time to start creating the Javadoc web pages from the code. If you and the rest of the team have been thorough in creating the documentation, you can do this simply by using the <javadoc> task. The task provides complete control of the normal javadoc program. For example, it enables custom doclets to generate customized documentation files and provides control over the generated HTML. Its basic use is quite straightforward:
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<target name="javadocs" depends="compile" description="make the java docs" > <mkdir dir="${javadoc.dir}"/> <javadoc author="true" destdir="${javadoc.dir}" packagenames="org.example.antbook.*" sourcepath="src" use="true" version="true" windowtitle="documentation" private="true"> <classpath refid="compile.classpath"/> </javadoc> </target>
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We aren t going to cover how to use the <javadoc> task because it would take far too long. It has 50-some parameters and over a dozen nested elements that show how complex creating the documentation can be. The underlying javadoc program has about 25 arguments; the complexity in the task is mainly to provide detailed control as to what that program does. Fortunately, only three arguments are required: the source and destination directories, and a list of files to document. The source attribute and <source> nested element let you name the Java files to document, but specifying packages is usually much easier, especially when you can give a wildcard to import an entire tree. There are three ways to specify a package, as listed in table 6.1. For any complex project, the standard tactic is to list the packages to compile with nested <package> elements, using wild cards to keep the number of declarations to a minimum.
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Table 6.1 Ways to specify packages to include. The final option, packagelist is not usually used; it exists to make it easier to migrate from Ant. Attribute/element Specification packagenames <package> packagelist Example
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List of packages, wildcards OK packagenames="org.*,edu.*,com.*" One package, wildcards OK <package name="org.example.antbook.*"/> File listing the packages to packagelist="packages.txt" import. This is handed directly to the javadoc program using packages.txt= the @ command. org.example. org.example.antbook
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