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Planning for High Availability in the Enterprise
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There are times when changes need to be implemented without being fully tested, such as security fixes. Your change control processes have to be flexible enough to accommodate emergency changes without sacrificing documentation. You should test all service packs and hot fixes to ensure compatibility with your sys tem configuration. The testing process also determines whether the application of a service pack or hot fix requires an outage on the server. If you haven t tested a service pack or hot fix with your particular configuration, you need to be prepared to sleep in the office because it will likely be a source of the next outage that occurs. Service packs and hot fixes apply not only to Windows and SQL Server but also to your own applications. You do require your developers to deliver changes that are fully pack aged with documentation instead of just dumping a bunch of files or telling you to unzip a file in a particular location, correct You need to define two paths for change control processes: planned and emergency. A planned change should require the following:
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All proposed changes are fully documented. Impact on the production system is analyzed. Changes have been tested to ensure that functionality is not affected. All changes are stress-tested. Management has approved the change. The change is scheduled during planned downtime. The reversion plan is fully documented and tested.
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Emergency changes, by their very nature, need to be implemented without being fully tested. Changes that fit into this category are implemented to either fix a system that is already unavailable or to prevent operational systems from being affected. Emer gency changes still need management approval before being implemented. Manage ment approval is required to ensure that a chain of notification is maintained. The operational system exists to service a portion of the business, so the stakeholder for an application still needs to have final approval of any changes.
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User errors are the second most common cause of systems being offline. This is the most difficult category of availability issues to resolve because user errors are not tech nical issues. A user accidentally deleting data or making invalid changes is a business issue, but it is still a perfectly valid database transaction. The only solution to this type
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Lesson 1: Assessing Database Availability Requirements
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of problem is to restore a backup to a secondary server, extract the data, and merge it back into the database.
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Planning for various types of natural disasters requires understanding the geo graphic scope of each event. No matter what the disaster, you cannot build a facility that can withstand being directly hit by one of these forces. Therefore, availability planning that takes these types of events into account means that you need to plan a secondary facility. Each type of natural disaster has a basic radius outside of which you can locate this secondary facility, but locating the facility even farther away pro vides better protection. You also need to be realistic when planning for a natural disaster within your avail ability architecture. It does not do any good to plan for an earthquake in the upper midwest of the United States because a quake strong enough to take down a building is a very unlikely event. Unless you are a government agency or emergency service, you aren t planning for the super disaster that totally disrupts the infrastructure. If something like that happens, you will have more important things to worry about than whether you can recover your order entry system within five minutes. Tornadoes are local phenomena that have a short radius. Planning for a tornado is gen erally limited to about a five-mile radius from your main facility. No tornado on record has ever been five miles wide; although it is possible for a tornado to travel 20 30 miles, they rarely do so in a straight line. Therefore, a secondary facility located approximately five miles from a main facility should be sufficient to protect your sys tems from a tornado hitting a building. Because a tornado is produced by a region of warmer air being covered by a region of cooler air, this type of storm can occur any where on the surface of the earth and needs to be planned for. Hurricanes and typhoons are much larger storms that can affect a wider geographic area. Hurricanes occur in the Atlantic and eastern Pacific oceans, and typhoons occur in the western Pacific and Indian oceans. These storms can affect facilities across hundreds of miles, although the effect is generally hundreds of miles along a coastline. Because these storms lose intensity as they cross land, by the time they push several hundred miles inland, they have lost enough strength so they no longer produce widespread devastation to facilities. This type of disaster is generally planned for in coastal regions; however, the coastal regions affected are generally very small. For example, you won t see a hurricane form within the Adriatic Sea. Locating a secondary facility approximately 150 200 miles inland of a primary
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