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For more information on deploying Windows Server Update Services, see 8, Planning a Windows 7 Client Update Strategy.
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The area with the most flexibility in the planning of your application deployment is the method by which you are going to install and run your workstation applications. Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 provide a variety of application deployment options, and selecting one is in most cases not a decision you want to leave to the end of the workstation deployment project. How you deploy applications to your workstations and how the workstations run those applications is all part of the fundamental philosophy you want to apply to your network. To illustrate with widely opposed examples, one enterprise might decide to deploy powerful, fat-client workstations with a lot of memory and large hard disks, so they can deploy all of their applications locally, as shown in Figure 9-3. In this case, the administrators must decide what method they want to use to install the applications on each computer.
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figURE 9-3 Fat clients with locally installed applications
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In contrast, another enterprise might choose to purchase relatively minimal, thin-client workstations and run the applications on their servers, as shown in Figure 9-4.
Thin Client
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Thin Client
figURE 9-4 Thin clients with server-based applications
These opposing scenarios have ramifications that extend far beyond the application deployment process. The fat-client model requires workstations with greater hardware requirements, which makes them more expensive to purchase. The administrators must install all of the applications on each computer individually and maintain them individually as well. By making the clients do most of the work, the servers can be relatively small.
Lesson 1: Designing an Application Deployment Strategy ChAPTER 9 361
The thin-client model enables the organization to purchase smaller, less expensive workstations, but at the same time, they must provide much larger servers with enough power to run all of the applications for all of the workstation users. The server hardware is much more expensive in this case, but the administrators have to install and maintain only one copy of the applications on each server. As you can see, virtually every phase of the workstation deployment process is affected by this decision. Workstation hardware, client configuration, server hardware, and software maintenance procedures are just a few of the elements that enterprise administrators must plan with the application deployment process in mind. The following sections describe the application deployment options available to the Windows 7 desktop administrator and the circumstances in which it is most appropriate to use each one.
Scaling the Application Deployment Process
As with the operating system deployment process, the size of the project is the first element that planners should consider when planning an application deployment. Installing applications on 10 computers is a lot different from installing them on 100, and 100 is very different from 1000. For the most part, the same rule applies to applications as to operating systems: the more workstations you have to install, the more you want to automate the process.
Using Server-Based Versus Client-Based Applications
The two basic options for deploying applications on Windows 7 workstations are to install them on a server or on the individual workstations. As mentioned earlier, the ramifications of this decision extend throughout the deployment process. To install applications on the clients, you must have workstations with sufficient hardware to run the applications, and you must perform an installation of each application on each computer. In a server-based deployment, you install a single copy of each application on a server and deploy it to the clients using a technology such as Remote Desktop Services.
INSTALLING APPLICATIONS ON CLIENTS
Client-based deployments require greater workstation hardware expenditures and have more complicated administrative life cycles, but they have distinct advantages as well. Because each workstation has its own copy of the applications, a certain level of performance is guaranteed, based on the local hardware available to run them. A server or network failure might be a temporary inconvenience to the users, but their work can usually continue. A client-based deployment requires the administrators to run an installation process for each application on each workstation, which can be a complicated undertaking. Maintenance is also complicated because each workstation must receive all updates and configuration changes individually. The amount of trouble this causes depends on the application itself. Microsoft Office, for example, requires frequent updates, but Microsoft Update enables administrators to deploy them along with the regular operating system updates. Other applications might require administrators to download and evaluate updates and then deploy them to each workstation. This is the type of situation in which a network
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