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Before You Begin
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This chapter presents the skills and concepts related to disk storage. You are able to apply several concepts and skills using hands-on exercises that require the following configuration:
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A computer installed with Windows Server 2003, Standard Edition or Enterprise Edition. The server should have at least one disk drive with a minimum of 1 gigabyte (GB) of unallocated space. The computer should be named Server01 and should be a domain controller in the contoso.com domain.
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Lesson 1
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Understanding Disk Storage Options
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Lesson 1: Understanding Disk Storage Options
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Before you tackle the installation of a disk drive and the configuration of that drive, you must understand several important storage concepts. This lesson will introduce you to the concepts, technologies, features, and terminology related to disk storage in Windows Server 2003. You will learn about differences between basic and dynamic disk storage types and the variety of logical volumes they support.
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After this lesson, you will be able to
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Understand disk-storage concepts and terminology Distinguish between basic and dynamic storage Identify the strengths and limitations of basic and dynamic disks Identify the types of storage volumes supported on Windows Server 2003 managed disks
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Estimated lesson time: 15 minutes
Physical Disks
Physical disks are the conglomeration of plastic, metal, and silicon that enables users to store enormous quantities of useless data and MP3s and the occasional business document. Of course I m being sarcastic here, but it is important to understand the difference between the physical disk and its logical volume(s), which are discussed in the next paragraph. It is also helpful to remember that an advanced disk subsystem, such as a hardware-based redundant array of independent disks (RAID) system, may consist of several physical disks, but its dedicated hardware controllers abstract the physical composition of the disk set so that Windows Server 2003 perceives and represents the disk system as a single physical disk.
Logical Volumes
A logical volume is the basic unit of disk storage that you configure and manage. A logical volume may include space on more than one physical disk. Logical volumes (also called logical disks in the context of performance monitoring) are physically distinct storage units, allowing the separation of different types of information such as the operating system, applications, and user data. Logical volumes have traditionally been represented by a single drive letter. As you dig into disk-related terminology, you will learn about partitions, logical drives, and volumes. Many resources will use all these terms interchangeably, which is possible because the technical distinctions between the terms are minuscule, and the user interface and command-line tools guide you clearly by exposing only the appropriate type of logical volume based on the task you are performing. Don t get too hung up on
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Managing Microsoft Windows Server 2003 Disk Storage
the distinctions between the terms; they will become clear through experience if not through analysis.
Mounted Volumes
You noticed that we said, Logical volumes have traditionally been represented by a single drive letter. That structure severely limited (to 26, says my kindergarten teacher) the number of volumes you could create on a system and the flexibility with which those volumes could be used. The NTFS file system of Windows Server 2003 allows you to assign one or no drive letter to a volume. In addition, you can mount a volume to one or more empty folders on existing NTFS volumes. For example, you might create an empty folder Docs, on an existing volume with the drive letter X, and mount a new 120 GB logical volume to that folder. When users navigate to X:\Docs, the disk subsystem redirects the input/output (I/O) requests to the new volume. All of this is transparent to users: they are simply able to store 120 GB of additional data on the X drive. The possibilities using this powerful feature are, as they say, limitless. By mounting a volume to a folder path, you can extend the available drive space on an existing volume. If the existing volume is not fault-tolerant, but the new volume is fault-tolerant, the folder to which the volume is mounted, X:\Docs, represents a fault-tolerant portion of the existing volume s namespace. You could, theoretically, mount all logical volumes on a server to folders on the server s C or D drive and thereby unify enormous storage capacity under the namespace of a single drive letter.
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