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Before You Begin
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To complete this chapter, you should be familiar with the basic administration of Microsoft Windows 2000 Server or Windows Server 2003.
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1
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Introduction to Active Directory and Network Infrastructure
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Lesson 1: Active Directory Overview
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Active Directory provides a means of coordinating the resources on a network and presenting them as a centralized source of information. This lesson introduces the principal functions and architecture of Active Directory.
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After this lesson, you will be able to
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Explain the purpose of Active Directory on a network. Describe the logical and physical structure of Active Directory. Describe the interactions of the different components of Active Directory. Explain the importance of the Active Directory Schema.
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Estimated lesson time: 45 minutes
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What Is Active Directory
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A directory is really just an easy way to look things up. There are directories everywhere. When you look up a number in your phone book, you are using a directory. When you organize the files and folders on your computer, you are also using a directory. Like these, the Active Directory is a collection of information in this case, a collection of information about the resources available on a Windows Server 2003 network.
The Need for Directory Services
The traditional method for keeping up with the enormous amount of information about network resources is to store it in separate directories that are typically managed from within the application or operating system component that uses the information. A perfect example of this lies just a few years back in versions of Windows prior to Windows 2000. On a typical Windows NT 4.0 based network, for example, you might find several directories of information scattered across servers on a network. Users and access-controls lists were kept within a directory called the Security Accounts Manager (SAM) database. Exchange Server mailboxes and their user associations were stored in the Exchange directory. Other services and applications maintained their own directo ries. Although there was some interaction between these directories, they were largely separate. Directories were most often developed for a particular application. Developers of these directories had no real incentive to provide integration with other systems. However, administrators and users who were faced with ever-increasing amounts of work did have a real need for all these separate databases to be able to work together and be managed as a single unit.
Lesson 1
Active Directory Overview
What Directory Services Bring to the Table
Directory services go beyond the functionality of scattered, proprietary directories by providing a unified source of information. Active Directory is not the first directory ser vice. In fact, there are several directory services and standards used on networks today. These include (but are not limited to):
X.500 and the Directory Access Protocol (DAP) X.500 is an Internet Stan dards Organization (ISO) specification that defines how global directories should be structured. X.500 specifies the use of DAP to provide communication between clients and directory servers. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) LDAP was developed in response to criticism that DAP was just too complicated for use on most directory service implementations. LDAP has quickly become the standard directory proto col used on the Internet. Novell Directory Services (NDS) NDS is the directory service used for Novell Netware networks and complies with the X.500 standard. Active Directory Active Directory is integral to Windows 2000 and Windows Server 2003 based networks. It was designed to comply with the LDAP standard.
For more technical information on the X.500, DAP and LDAP standards (and any , other Internet standards), go to www.ietf.org, the official site of the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). Run a keyword search using the terms X.500, DAP or LDAP , .
See Also
For a complex network, a directory service should provide an efficient way to manage, find, and access all the resources on a network resources such as computers, users, printers, shared folders, and many others. A good directory service implementation should provide a number of core benefits:
Centralization The idea behind centralization is to reduce the number of direc tories on a network. Bringing information about all network resources into a cen tralized directory provides a single point of management, easing the administration of resources and allowing you to more effectively delegate admin istrative tasks. It also provides a single point of entry for network users (or their computers or applications) when searching for resources. Scalability A directory service should also be able to accommodate the growth of a network without incurring significant additional overhead. This means that there needs to be a way of breaking up (or partitioning) the directory database so that it does not grow too large to be usable, while still maintaining the benefits of centralization.
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