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From app to applet
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Enigma emulator onto the desktop is as simple as pulling it from the browser window and closing the page. The applet will automatically transform into a desktop application, complete with startup icon (although in reality it remains a JWS application, it merely has a new home). Removing the application should be as simple as following the regular uninstall process for software on your operating system. For example, Windows users can use the Add or Remove Programs feature inside Control Panel. Enigma will be listed along with other installed applications, with a button to remove it. At last we have a fully functional JavaFX applet.
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Bonus: Building the UI in an art tool
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Before we get to the summing up, there s just enough time for another quick end-ofchapter detour. At the end of section 9.2.6, when we coded the Enigma s lamps, I mentioned the possibility of building an entire UI inside a design/art tool. In this section we re going to do just that. Figure 9.13 shows a UI constructed in Inkscape. The left-hand side of the window contains two buttons, each constructed from four layers stacked atop each other. The right-hand side indicates how those layers are formed.
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Figure 9.13 Two buttons (left), each formed using four carefully labeled layers (demonstrated right), which are manipulated by JavaFX code to create functioning buttons
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Each button layer has an ID consisting of a base ID for that button, followed by a letter denoting the layer s function: either F (footprint), I (idle), H (hover), or C (clicked). The idle layer is shown when the button is idle (not hovered over or pressed), the hover layer is shown when the mouse is inside the button, and the clicked layer is shown when the button is pressed. Only one of these three layers is visible at any one time. The final layer, footprint, is used as a target for event handlers and to define the shape of the button; it is never actually displayed. Listing 9.15 is sample code that loads the FXD created from the Inkscape file and manipulates the two buttons inside it. The first button has a base ID of button1, and the second has a base ID of button2.
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Listing 9.15 UI.fx
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import import import import javafx.fxd.FXDNode; javafx.scene.Node; javafx.scene.input.MouseEvent; javafx.scene.Scene;
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Bonus: Building the UI in an art tool
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import javafx.stage.Stage; def ui:FXDNode = FXDNode { url: "{__DIR__}ui.fxz" }; FXDButton { fxd: ui; id: "button1"; action: function() { println("Button 1 clicked"); } } FXDButton { fxd: ui; id: "button2"; action: function() { println("Button 2 clicked"); } } Stage { scene: Scene { content: ui; } } class FXDButton { var footprintNode:Node; var idleNode:Node; var hoverNode:Node; var clickNode:Node; public-init var fxd:FXDNode; public-init var id:String; public-init var action:function():Void; init { footprintNode = fxd.getNode("{id}F"); idleNode = fxd.getNode("{id}I"); hoverNode = fxd.getNode("{id}H"); clickNode = fxd.getNode("{id}C"); makeVisible(idleNode); footprintNode.onMouseEntered = function(ev:MouseEvent) { makeVisible( if(footprintNode.pressed) clickNode else hoverNode ); } footprintNode.onMouseExited = function(ev:MouseEvent) { makeVisible(idleNode); } footprintNode.onMousePressed = function(ev:MouseEvent) { makeVisible(clickNode); if(action!=null) action(); } footprintNode.onMouseReleased = function(ev:MouseEvent) { makeVisible( if(footprintNode.hover) hoverNode else idleNode ); } }
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Root scene graph node of FXD
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function makeVisible(n:Node) : Void { for(i:Node in [idleNode,hoverNode,clickNode]) i.visible = (i==n); } }
The FXDButton class is the hub of the action, turning parts of the FXD scene graph into a button. It accepts an FXDNode object, a base ID, and an action function to run when the button is clicked. During initialization it locates the four required layer nodes inside the FXD structure and adds the necessary event code to make them function as a button. For example, a base ID of button1 extracts nodes with IDs of button1F, button1I, button1H, and button1C and then adds event handlers to the footprint node to control the visibility of the other three according to mouse events. (In the original Inkscape file the layers were labeled with IDs of jfx:button1F, jfx:button1I, etc.) The beauty of this scheme is that a designer can create whole UI scene graphs inside Inkscape, Photoshop, or Illustrator, and then a programmer can turn them into functional user interfaces without having to recompile the code each time the design is tweaked. This brings us perilously close to the Holy Grail of desktop software programming: no more tedious and inflexible reconstructions of a designer s artwork using UI widgets and fiddly layout code; designers draw what they want, and programmers breathe life directly into their art. I m certainly not suggesting that in the future every UI will be constructed this way. This technique suits UIs resembling interactive photos or animations, an informal style previously used only in video games and children s software but now becoming increasingly trendy with other types of software too. I expect most UIs will become a fusion of the formal and informal an audio production tool, for example, may have a main window looking just like a picture of a studio mixing desk, but secondary windows will still use familiar widgets (albeit styled). As JavaFX (and its supporting tool set) continues to grow, we can expect more and more animation and transition capabilities to be shifted away from the source code and exposed directly to the designer. While highly sophisticated UIs will probably always need to be developed predominantly by a programmer, the ultimate goal of JFX is to allow simple (bold, fun, colorful) UIs to be developed in design tools and then plugged into the application at runtime. Updating the UI becomes as simple as exporting a new FXD/FXZ file.
Summary
In this chapter we looked at writing a practical application, with a swish front end, focusing on a couple of important JavaFX skills. First of all we looked at how to take the hard work of a friendly neighborhood graphic designer, bring it directly into our JavaFX project, and manipulate it as part of the JFX scene graph. Then we examined how to take our own hard work and magically transform it into an applet capable of
Summary
being dragged from the browser and turned into a JWS application. (Okay, okay, it s not actually magic!) I hope this chapter, as well as being a fun little project, has demonstrated how easy it is to move JavaFX software from one environment to another and how simple it is to move multimedia elements from artist to programmer. The addition of a Stage extension was all it took to add applet-specific capabilities to our Enigma machine, and conversion into FXZ files was all it took to turn our vector images into programmable elements in our project. There are plans to bring JavaFX to many different types of device in the future. The ability to leap across environments in a single bound would be a welcome change to the current drudgery of moving applications between platforms. The bonus section revealed how entire UIs could be drawn by a designer and then hooked up directly into JavaFX code. Imagine if we could switch the whole design of our application for desktop, mobile, or TV by merely choosing which FXZ file was loaded on startup! It s this sense of freedom, in both how we work and where our code can run, that will be central to JavaFX as it evolves in years to come. So much for the future. For now, I ll just set the Enigma rotors to an appropriate three letters (I ll let you guess what they might be) and leave you with the simple departing message NIAA CHZ ZBPS DVD AWOBHC RKNAHI.
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