Suggested Practice in .NET framework

Creation PDF 417 in .NET framework Suggested Practice

Suggested Practice
Encode PDF417 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode creation for .NET Control to generate, create PDF417 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Scan PDF 417 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
To help you successfully master the exam objectives presented in this chapter, complete the following task.
Bar Code Generation In .NET
Using Barcode printer for VS .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Reader In VS .NET
Using Barcode reader for .NET framework Control to read, scan read, scan image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Partitioning Tables
PDF-417 2d Barcode Printer In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode printer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create PDF417 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Drawing PDF-417 2d Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create PDF417 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Practice 1
Painting PDF 417 In VB.NET
Using Barcode maker for VS .NET Control to generate, create PDF417 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UPC Symbol Printer In VS .NET
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create three tables in a database that all use the same partition function and partition scheme and that have the same structure. Name the tables Stage, Main, and Archive. Add data into Main. Using the SPLIT, MERGE, and SWITCH operations, remove data from Main and add it to Archive. Move data from Archive into Stage.
Code 39 Full ASCII Generator In .NET Framework
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code 3/9 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Draw Matrix 2D Barcode In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Matrix 2D Barcode image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Take a Practice Test
Paint Barcode In VS .NET
Using Barcode generation for .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
OneCode Creator In .NET Framework
Using Barcode generation for VS .NET Control to generate, create USPS Intelligent Mail image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The practice tests on this book s companion CD offer many options. For example, you can test yourself on just the content covered in this chapter, or you can test yourself on all the 70-431 certification exam content. You can set up the test so that it closely
Bar Code Drawer In C#
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create bar code image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create ECC200 In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPad Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in iPad applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
6 Review
Drawing UPC-A Supplement 5 In VB.NET
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create UPC Symbol image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Creating EAN128 In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create UCC.EAN - 128 image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
simulates the experience of taking a certification exam, or you can set it up in study mode so that you can look at the correct answers and explanations after you answer each question.
Code-128 Recognizer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode decoder for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UCC - 12 Creator In C#
Using Barcode creation for VS .NET Control to generate, create UCC - 12 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
MORE INFO
Code128 Recognizer In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 3/9 Encoder In None
Using Barcode printer for Online Control to generate, create Code 39 Full ASCII image in Online applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Practice tests
For details about all the practice test options available, see the How to Use the Practice Tests section in this book s Introduction.
7
Implementing Views
A view is simply a SELECT statement that has a name and is stored in Microsoft SQL Server. Views act as virtual tables to provide several benefits. A view gives developers a standardized way to execute queries, enabling them to write certain common queries once as views and then include the views in application code so that all applications use the same version of a query. A view can also provide a level of security by giving users access to just a subset of data contained in the base tables that the view is built over and can give users a more friendly, logical view of data in a database. In addition, a view with indexes created on it can provide dramatic performance improvements, especially for certain types of complex queries. Most views allow only read operations on underlying data, but you can also create updateable views that let users modify data via the view. This chapter shows you how to leverage the power and flexibility of views by creating regular views, updateable views, and indexed views.
Exam objectives in this chapter:
Implement a view.
Create an indexed view. Create an updateable view. Assign permissions to a role or schema for a view.
Lessons in this chapter:
Lesson 1: Creating a View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Lesson 2: Modifying Data Through Views . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 245 Lesson 3: Creating an Indexed View . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 248
Before You Begin
To complete the lessons in this chapter, you must have
SQL Server 2005 installed. A copy of the AdventureWorks sample database installed in the instance.
7
Implementing Views
Real World
Michael Hotek A couple of years ago, I had a two-week project with a customer who was experiencing performance issues. When I started looking into the database, I knew I was in for a big challenge. There were tens of thousands of lines of code spread among almost 2,000 stored procedures, functions, and triggers along with about 350 tables. What really stood out at first glance were the more than 800 views in the database. Having a large number of views in a database isn t necessarily a problem. But having more than twice as many views as tables told me that either the tables were poorly designed or the views were not being properly used. Unfortunately, in this case, it was both but that is a story for a different day. As I investigated, I found views that did nothing more than select a handful of columns from a single table by using a simple WHERE clause. After looking at about the 50th view, I discovered that something wasn t right. Cross-referencing back to the views I already looked at, I found a duplicate. Then I found another and another and another. In one instance, I found 23 views that all did the same thing. It turns out that the developers were in a hurry to create applications and deploy new features. At some point, one of the database administrators (DBAs) dictated that all data access had to be through views because the DBA mistakenly thought that a view gave a performance improvement. So several years later, the company had hundreds of views embedded in the applications. And finding anything was so difficult that developers simply created new views whenever they needed anything, making a bad situation even worse. Fortunately, the applications were not directly accessing tables or views; data access was through stored procedures. So the first step in the process was to wade through the stored procedure, function, and trigger code for references to duplicate views. By removing all the duplicates, we could drop more than 400 views. We then took the second step of eliminating anything that really shouldn t have been a view in the first place. We defined unnecessary views as views that accessed only one table through a simple WHERE clause; views that implemented things that did not belong in a view, such as a hard-coded list of states; and views that contained simple logic that any developer should understand.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.