ConfigurationUserLevel Enumeration in Visual C#.NET

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ConfigurationUserLevel Enumeration
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Name None PerUserRoaming PerUserRoamingAndLocal
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Description Gets the System.Configuration.Configuration object that applies to all users Gets the roaming System.Configuration.Configuration object that applies to the current user Gets the local System.Configuration.Configuration object that applies to the current user
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The main issue to be aware of is that the default setting here is None, which might appear counterintuitive to some. The next issue that might need elaboration involves the ExeConfigurationFileMap object or File Map. Not surprisingly, if you want to use a mapped file, the runtime needs some mechanism to inform it that you want to do so, as well as a mechanism for telling it where that file can be found. This process is facilitated through the ExeConfigFilename property. When you call either the OpenMappedExeConfiguration or OpenMappedMachineConfiguraton method, you re informing the runtime of your intention to use a mapped file. The constructor requires this, so the only other minimum requirement is to specify a file location. The consuming application will need adequate permissions to access this file, so you ll need to ensure that the file exists and that you have permission to access it.
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Permissions and declarative security
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Managing permissions is an essential part of creating secure .NET Framework applications. The subject of permissions and both declarative and imperative security is covered in depth in 11. Additional information is available on MSDN at http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/ default.asp url=/library/en-us/cpguide/html/cpconPermissions.asp.
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Lesson 1: Configuration Settings
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In addition to ensuring that the user has permissions to access the file, you will need to verify the location of the file. If you specify an empty string or blank for the ExeConfigFilename property, the runtime will throw an ArgumentException. Figure 9-1 shows the output of an attempt to set the ExeConfigFilename property to String.Empty.
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Figure 9-1 Attempting to set ExeConfigFilename to an empty string
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Unfortunately, if you set the ExeConfigFilename to a file that is nonexistent, the runtime will not stop you from doing so (until later when you have null values when you expected something else). You can avoid this mistake by ensuring that you have a valid file before setting this property. You can implement whatever control flow logic you want, but for the sake of clarity we ll use a debug assertion here to verify the file s existence:
' VB Dim cs As Configuration = ConfigurationManager.OpenMachineConfiguration() Debug.Assert(File.Exists(ExeFileName), _ "The mapped file or path is missing or incorrect!"); MyMap.ExeConfigFilename = ExeFileName // C# ExeConfigurationFileMap MyMap = new ExeConfigurationFileMap(); String ExeFileName = @"DBConnectionString.exe.config"; Debug.Assert(File.Exists(ExeFileName), "The mapped file or path is missing or incorrect!"); MyMap.ExeConfigFilename = ExeFileName;
Common Settings
The term common settings refers to a few areas that determine how applications run. An example of this functionality is configuring an application to run under a specific version of the .NET Framework. For example, you might build an application with a given version of the Framework but choose to run it with a different one. To be able
9
Installing and Configuring Applications
to do this, you must specify the supportedRuntime version in the startup section. If you wanted to run your application under the 1.1 version of the Framework, you d enter the following code in the configuration section of the application or Web configuration file:
< xml version ="1.0" > <configuration> <startup> <supportedRuntime version="v1.1.4322" /> </startup> </configuration>
However, there might be instances where the version you want to run under isn t present on the machine. There are strict rules that are followed in these instances:
If the version of the Framework that the application was built on is present, that version will be used by the application. If the version of the Framework that the application was built on isn t present and nothing is specified in the supportedRuntime version tag, the application will run under the latest version of the Framework that is available on the machine. So it would run under .NET Framework 2.0 if that was the only version present, even if the application was built under the 1.x versions. If the version of the Framework that the application was built on isn t present but the configuration file specifies a supportedRuntime tag, the .NET Framework will use the specified runtime version although the specified version must be present on the computer.
These rules are intuitive. If you don t have the right version of the runtime that an application needs and you don t specify a different version, the runtime will do it s best to run the application. If the runtime can t run the assembly with the available version, you have a problem. Another common scenario involves using a shared assembly and verifying that it works with multiple applications. Installing this given assembly to the global assembly cache (GAC) and uninstalling it from the GAC can be cumbersome. To accommodate this task, there is a specific variable called the DEVPATH that can be configured. To take advantage of this, two things need to be done: 1. Add an environment variable named DEVPATH that points to the location of the assembly.
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