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For details about all the practice test options available, see the How to Use the Practice Tests section in this book s Introduction.
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Configuring IP Routing
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IP networks, including home networks, enterprise intranets, and the Internet, consist of a series of interconnected routers. Routers forward traffic to computers, to other routers, and finally to a destination computer. At the most basic, client computers send all communications through a single router known as the default gateway. If you connect multiple routers to a single subnet, however, you might need to configure more complex routing for computers on the subnet. Additionally, computers running Windows Server 2008 can act as routers.
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Exam objectives in this chapter:
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Configure routing.
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Lesson 1: Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255
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Before You Begin
To complete the lessons in this chapter, you should be familiar with Microsoft Windows networking and be comfortable with basic network configuration, including configuring IP settings. You will also need a computer named Dcsrv1 that has at least one network interface, connected to a network with a router that is connected to the Internet.
NOTE
Computer and domain names
The computer and domain names you use will not affect these practices. The practices in this chapter refer to these computer names for simplicity, however.
5
Configuring IP Routing
Real World
Tony Northrup For the exam it s important to understand how to configure Windows Server 2008 as a router. In the real world you ll almost never use computers as routers. Hardware-based routers offer better performance with a lower purchase cost and cheaper maintenance. More important, they offer much better reliability. Because routers are designed to be only routers (whereas Windows Server 2008 is designed to be everything from a Web server to a mail server), much less can go wrong.
Lesson 1: Routing
Lesson 1: Routing
This lesson provides an overview of routing concepts, describes how to troubleshoot routing problems using PathPing and TraceRt, and then shows you how to configure static routing.
After this lesson, you will be able to: Describe routing concepts. Use PathPing and TraceRt to examine network routes. Describe and configure routing protocols. Use static routing to configure access to networks that cannot be reached through a default gateway. Estimated lesson time: 45 minutes
Routing Overview
Figure 5-1 shows a typical enterprise intranet consisting of three locations, each with four routers. As you can see, any of the example computers can communicate with any other computer by forwarding communications between routers.
Chicago
San Diego
Orlando
Figure 5-1
A typical intranet
5
Configuring IP Routing
As you know from earlier chapters, every computer must have a unique IP address. A router has an IP address, too, and must have a unique IP address assigned to every network interface. Figure 5-2 shows the Chicago network from Figure 5-1 with more detail, showing sample IP addresses for every router interface.
Chicago 192.168.2.1 192.168.1.10 10.1.1.1 10.1.2.1 10.1.2.2 192.168.1.1 10.1.3.1 10.1.1.2 10.1.3.2 192.168.2.10
Figure 5-2
A routed network with IP addresses
On the network shown in Figure 5-2, imagine that the mobile computer on the left needs to connect to the server on the right. In this example the mobile computer has the IP address 192.168.1.10. The router on the same subnet has the IP address 192.168.1.1 and would be configured as the default gateway on the mobile computer. To communicate from the mobile computer to the server, the process would be: 1. The mobile computer sends a packet with a source IP address of 192.168.1.10 and a destination IP address of 192.168.2.10. The mobile computer compares the destination IP address to the network ID of the local subnet and determines that the packet must be sent to a remote network. Because remote networks are always accessed through routers, the mobile computer forwards the packet to the default gateway with the IP address 192.168.1.1. Gateway is just another term for router. 2. When the default gateway receives the packet, it checks the destination address, 192.168.2.10. It examines its routing table and determines that the next hop (a term for a router in a path) is the router with the IP address 10.1.1.2. So it forwards the packet to 10.1.1.2. 3. When the router with IP address 10.1.12 receives the packet, it also checks the destination IP address, 192.168.2.10, and determines that the next hop toward the destination is the router with the IP address 10.1.3.1. 4. When the router with IP address 10.1.3.1 receives the packet, it checks the destination IP address, 192.168.2.10, and determines that it has a network interface that is directly
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