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Part 2: Building a Microsoft Access Desktop Application
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Microsoft Office Access 2003 Inside Out Although standards exist for SQL, most software companies have implemented variations on or extensions to the language to handle specific features of their products. Also, several products evolved before standards were well established, so the companies producing those products invented their own SQL syntaxes, which differ from the official standard. An SQL statement intended to be executed by Microsoft SQL Server might require modification before it can be executed by other databases that support SQL, such as DB2 or Oracle, and vice versa. To solve this problem, a group of influential hardware and software companies more than 30 of them, including Microsoft Corporation formed the SQL Access Group. The group s goal was to define a common base SQL implementation that its members products could all use to talk to one another. The companies jointly developed the Common Language Interface (CLI) for all the major variants of SQL, and they committed themselves to building CLI support into their products. About a dozen of these companies jointly demonstrated this capability in early 1992. In the meantime, Microsoft formalized the CLI for workstations and announced that Microsoft products especially those designed for the Microsoft Windows operating system would use this interface to access SQL databases. Microsoft calls this formalized interface the Open Database Connectivity (ODBC) standard. In the spring of 1992, Microsoft announced that more than a dozen database and application software vendors had committed to providing ODBC support in their products by the end of 1992. With Access, Microsoft provides the basic ODBC Driver Manager and the driver to translate ODBC SQL to the SQL understood by Microsoft SQL Server. Microsoft has also worked with several database vendors to develop drivers for other databases. You can see a diagram of the ODBC architecture in Figure 6-1.
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Windows application using SQL (such as Microsoft Access or Microsoft Excel) Direct connection via Access JET engine to mdb, spreadsheet, text, dBase, and Paradox
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Part 2: Building a Microsoft Access Desktop Application
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Figure 6-1. The Microsoft ODBC architecture.
Part 1: Part Title
Importing and Linking Data Access was one of Microsoft s first ODBC-compliant products, and the ODBC Driver Manager is a standard part of Microsoft s operating systems. Microsoft has further refined this architecture with the introduction of ActiveX Data Objects (ADO). ADO is a special library of objects that you can use to fetch and update data from any database, including Microsoft Access. Once you ve added the drivers for the other SQL databases that you want to work with, you can use Access to build an application using data from any of these databases. Note You can use ADO as a universal interface to both databases that support ODBC as well as to those that do not. See 22, Understanding Visual Basic Fundamentals, for details about working with ADO using Visual Basic.
Importing vs. Linking Database Files
You have the choice of importing or linking data from other databases, but how do you decide which type of access is best Here are some guidelines.
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You should consider importing another database file when any of the following is true:
The file you need is relatively small and is not changed frequently by users of the other
database application.
You don t need to share the data you create with users of the other database application. You re replacing the old database application, and you no longer need the data in the
old format.
You need to load data (such as customers or products as I mentioned earlier) from You need the best performance while working with the data from the other database
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another source to begin populating your Access tables. (because Access performs best with a local copy of the data in Access s native format). On the other hand, you should consider linking another database file when any of the following is true:
The file is larger than the maximum capacity of a local Access database (2 gigabytes). You must share the data on a network with users of the other database application. You ll be distributing your application to several individual users, and you will need to The file is changed frequently by users of the other database application.
make changes to the queries, forms, reports, and modules in the application without disturbing data already entered in the tables.
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