Designing Access Control for Enterprise Data in Visual C#.NET

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Designing Access Control for Enterprise Data
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The difficulty involved in knowing when new employees are added. The limited knowledge of a particular group s administrator. The administrator in charge of managing the group will be part of the administrative structure of the domain that the computer belongs to. She will not have knowledge of users in the other domains.
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To more easily manage the problem of working with many members in a group, you can adhere to the following best practices regarding group strategy. The strategy uses the employee example, but it can be modified for many circumstances.
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Create a global group in each domain for employees. Place all domain accounts that belong to employees in the global group in their respective domains. Nest the global groups, one for each domain, in the local group. In this example, nesting means to make the global group a member of the local group. Grant the local group access to all resources that all employees can access. If access to resources on other servers is required, use a domain local group or create a machine local group where the need is. Manage the membership of the global groups at the domain level. Instead of plac ing user accounts directly in the machine local group account, you can create glo bal groups at each domain and each employee s account will be placed in the global group created in his or her domain.
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What Are the Nesting Rules
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The previous example shows the nesting rules that are followed in a Windows 2000 mixed functional level domain: global groups can be nested in local groups. In a Win dows 2000 native functional level domain or Windows Server 2003 functional level domain, additional nesting rules apply:
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Domain local groups can nest in domain local groups from their own domain. Global groups can nest in other global groups and in universal groups. Universal groups can nest in local groups, global groups, and other universal groups.
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Lesson 1
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Designing the Access Control Infrastructure
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Improve Security by Using Group Nesting
We know that unused accounts should be disabled and removed as soon as pos sible. We know that it is important to remove and re-assign privileges and permis sions when an employee changes a job. However, IT might be the last to know when employees leave the company or are transferred to another job. When IT does receive notice, if permissions have been assigned to these user accounts, locating and removing the employees access across the enterprise is a difficult and time-consuming process. On the other hand, if privileges and permissions are assigned to groups, we only need to remove the user accounts from the groups they are a member of to remove their privileges. There are far fewer groups in the user s domain than there are resources in the enterprise. Even a manual search, group by group, is far less trouble than attempting to find every place that a user account might be assigned access. When best practices are followed, removing a user s access to resources is greatly simplified. When best practices are followed, the possibility that some unknown access permission will provide inappropriate access is reduced.
Guidelines for Designing an Appropriate Group Strategy for Accessing Resources
Follow these guidelines when designing group strategy for accessing resources:
Create groups that represent user roles. Doing this will make it easy to determine which resources they should have access to. Give these groups the privileges and access that is required. Never assign privileges and permissions to individual user accounts. Use group nesting to ease the security burden. Nest multiple groups that contain users into a single local group. Give this group access. Not only is it easier to manage group memberships but resource access can be easily removed. Removing access to a resource is a quick way of preventing or limiting intrusion if you know or suspect that your system has been compromised. Use built-in operating system groups where the permissions and privileges given the operating system groups exactly meet the needs of the user role. Protect administrative groups. Do not allow a user with less privilege to manage groups that have more privileges. Create group accounts and user accounts in organizational units (OUs), and then assign management privileges over these groups by delegating control of the OU. Limit the administrative authority of these managers. Do not provide users who manage groups with rights outside the OU. Use a naming structure that clearly indicates the group scope. For example, pref ace domain local groups with DLG_ and global groups with GG_.
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