qr code generator c# dll free Event ID 675 529 530 531 533 534 in Visual C#.NET

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Event ID 675 529 530 531 533 534
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535 536 537 539
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An example of a failed logon event is shown in Figure 9-20. Notice the logon type, user name, and server name.
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Lesson 3
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Analyzing Auditing Requirements
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Figure 9-20 Failed logon
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If a number of failed logon events for a specific account have occurred, look for a suc cessful logon event. Successful logon events might also indicate a successful Kerberos ticket issuance. Successful logon events are listed in Table 9-6.
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Table 9-6
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Successful Logon Events
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Description Successful logon. Successful network logon. An authentication service (AS) ticket was issued. An AS ticket is issued when a request for access to a service is requested. A ticket granting service (TGS) ticket was issued. A TGS ticket is issued when authentication is successful. An AS or TGS ticket was successfully renewed. Successful logoff. Successful user-initiated logoff.
Event ID 528 540 672 673 674 538 551
A successful logon event is shown in Figure 9-21. Notice that the User name is indi cated in the User field. This is the field that can be filtered on in the Event log. Shown in Figure 9-22 is a successful logoff event. It might be important to track and match logon with logoff and then, from the time stamps on the records, determine that a user was logged on when a security event occurred. User logoff and logon events can be matched by logon ID. The examples given, Figure 9-21 and Figure 9-22, are the logon
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9
Designing Access Control for Enterprise Data
and logoff events for Kevin F. Browne. You can verify this by comparing the logon ID and verifying that they are the same. By the time stamps, you can tell that Kevin was logged on for approximately four and a half minutes.
Figure 9-21 Successful logon
Figure 9-22 Successful logoff
Lesson 3
Analyzing Auditing Requirements
9-45
Example of Taking Ownership By default, administrators have the user right to take ownership. To protect confidential information, data owners might request that the IT administrator not have access privileges on sensitive files. This can easily be done by removing the administrator s group access permissions on the files. However, the admin istrator can take ownership of the file and give herself any access she wants. Nothing can prevent her from doing so. However, you can audit files that are configured to block administrator access by auditing for this event and tracking object access events. Figure 9-23 shows the configuration for auditing for use of the Take Ownership permission. To ensure that the administrator is caught, you should also audit for privilege use. Two possible events can be recorded. If the administrator attempts access while logged on interactively to the server on which the file resides, the Se_TakeownershipPrivilege, event 578, is recorded. This is a privilege usage event. However, if she takes ownership remotely, the file Take Ownership permission (WRITE_OWNER) is used. This is object access event 560. With all this noted, remem ber that administrators can also delete audit logs, either in their entirety or by individ ual events. If you have untrustworthy administrators, the only solution is to not allow them to be administrators.
Figure 9-23 Auditing for Take Ownership
See Also To prevent an administrator from reading a file, you can encrypt the file. However, if you do so, make sure the administrator is not the file recovery agent. To learn why and what you can do to prevent administrators from reading sensitive files, see Lesson 5, Designing a File Encryption and Decryption Strategy later in the chapter.
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Designing Access Control for Enterprise Data
Auditing Considerations
When analyzing auditing requirements, consider the following:
Auditing requirements are different based on computer role. Choose an auditing policy that provides the information necessary for each computer role. Auditing provides little value unless events are reviewed. A policy should be established to review security logs. Auditing requirements can change over time. One example would be when spe cific users are suspected of unauthorized file access, tampering, or improper access. In this situation, you could set up auditing on sensitive files for these users or the groups that they are in, record security events, and then analyze the infor mation. When the information needed is accumulated, you would remove the auditing requirements. Centralizing the collection of auditing events is essential to sound security event record management and might be required by regulations or industry rules. Auditing process activity is not a good idea, in general, for production servers. It is a sound strategy for periodic use on test systems. Recording privilege access events will also generate a large number of events. Weigh the need to manage logs that this will create, and determine whether this is a worthwhile event. Setting object access auditing on files, folders, registry keys, and Active Directory objects can be affected by inheritance rules. When setting object auditing, you can set the requirements on a parent object and require that audit settings are pushed to subobjects by inheritance. You can also prevent the inheritance of SACLs by clearing the Allow Inheritable Auditing Entries from the Parent to Propagate to This Object and All Child Objects. Include These With Entries Explicitly Defined Here check box. Figure 9-24 illustrates this concept. The Marketing folder has inheritance blocked. Setting auditing for parent folders will have no affect on the Marketing folders.
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