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For the most part, different versions of Windows can coexist quite peacefully on a network, if you plan carefully. If you intend to use Internet Connection Sharing, you ll have best results if you install Windows XP (Professional or Home Edition) on the computer that has the Internet connection to be shared. You can then use the Windows XP Network Setup Wizard to configure other systems running Windows XP, Windows 2000, Windows Me, or Windows 98. Tip
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Set up a simple server If your network includes at least one computer running Windows XP Professional, you can use that machine as a workgroup server. Although this configuration doesn t come close to providing the centralized administration and security of a domain-based network, it does allow you to enforce security on a per-user basis. On the Windows XP Professional machine, disable Simple File Sharing and assign permissions to shared folders by selecting users and groups, as explained in Controlling Access with NTFS Permissions, page 260.
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Part 6: Networking
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Before you can even think about setting up the networking software in Windows XP, you need to assemble and configure the proper hardware. In addition to two or more computers, you ll need the following components to set up a home or small office network:
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Each computer needs an adapter (also called a network interface card, or NIC) to communicate with the other computers on the network. Network adapters can be internal (usually installed in a PCI slot) or external (typically connected to a USB port). The overwhelming majority of network adapters conform to the Ethernet standard. Use a hub or switch to connect the computers in an Ethernet network. This function is sometimes integrated in a router or residential gateway, which typically adds network address translation (NAT) capabilities and security features. On wireless networks that use the 802.11b or 802.11g standard, a wireless access point handles these duties. Networks that use the Home Phoneline Networking Alliance (HomePNA) standard do not require a hub. On an Ethernet network, you connect each network adapter to the hub using an eight-wire Category 5 patch cable with RJ-45 connectors on each end. HomePNA networks connect to an existing telephone jack with a standard telephone connector (RJ-11). By definition, wireless networks require no cables.
A central connection point
Cables
Although it s not required, most networks also include one additional hardware component: a modem or other device to connect your network to the Internet.
Part 6: Networking
23
Connect two computers without a hub If your home network consists of two computers and you have no plans to expand it, you can save yourself the cost of a hub and use a crossover cable instead. A crossover cable is identical to a standard patch cable, except that two wires are reversed, simulating the connection that would take place if the wires were plugged into a hub. Using a crossover cable is an acceptable solution when you want to connect two computers directly to transfer files quickly with a minimum of hassle; using Windows Explorer and a two-computer network is much less hassle than cumbersome solutions that require null-modem cables and extra software. A crossover cable can also serve as a permanent connection between two computers if one computer has an Internet connection and the other doesn t. But as soon as you add a third computer to the network, you ll need additional hardware to serve as a hub.
Microsoft Windows XP Inside Out, Second Edition
Ethernet, Wireless, or Phone Line
When setting up a network, you can choose from three popular technologies, all of which are supported by Windows XP: Ethernet/Fast Ethernet This popular networking standard, developed in the mid1970s, has stood the test of time. The original Ethernet standard (also known as 10Base-T) is capable of transferring data at maximum speeds of 10 megabits per second. The Fast Ethernet standard (also known as 100Base-T) can transfer data at 100 megabits per second. Some network adapters and hubs offer auto-switching (10/100) capabilities, allowing you to mix and match Ethernet and Fast Ethernet components on the same network. (Without this capability, a mixed network will throttle down to the speed of the slowest link.) A relatively new standard called Gigabit Ethernet allows data transfers at 1 gigabit (1,000 megabits) per second. In an office or home that is wired for Ethernet, you can plug your network adapter into a wall jack and install a hub at a central location called a patch panel. In a home or office without structured wiring, you ll need to plug directly into a hub. Wireless In recent years, wireless networking technology has enjoyed an explosion in popularity, thanks to its convenience and steadily decreasing prices. Although wireless networks were originally developed for use with notebooks, they are increasingly popular with desktop computer users, especially in homes and offices where it is impractical or physically impossible to run network cables. The most popular wireless networks use one of two variants of the IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 802.11 standard, also known as Wi-Fi. Using base stations and network adapters with small antennas, Wi-Fi networks using the 802.11b standard transfer data at a maximum frequency of 11 megabits per second (comparable to Ethernet speeds) using radio frequencies in the 2.4 GHz range. The newer 802.11g standard works at approximately five times the speed (54 megabits per second) using the same 2.4 GHz frequency range. Most 802.11g hardware works with 802.11b networks as well. A number of other wireless network standards promulgated by the IEEE s 802.11 Working Group promise benefits such as better security. Be aware that, despite the confusingly similar names, network equipment using one of the wireless standards is generally compatible only with other equipment using the exact same standard. In addition to 802.11b and 802.11g, you might encounter the following: 802.11a broadcasts in a different frequency range, 5 GHz, and can reach maximum speeds of 54 Mbps, roughly as fast as 802.11g networks. This standard was quickly overtaken by the 802.11g flavor of Wi-Fi and although it is fully supported by Windows XP it is, for all prac, tical purposes, obsolete.
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