Locating Workstations in VB.NET

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Locating Workstations
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Assuming that a floor plan for the site already exists that includes the location of users desks and other furniture, it may seem as though locating workstations is simply a mat ter of putting a computer on each desk. Actually, there is a good deal more to it than that. Planning also includes determining what type of computer is needed and exactly where the equipment should be located in relation to the desk.
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Lesson 4
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Locating Network Resources
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Most users in a typical office are well served by a standard desktop computer as a workstation, but you still must choose the type of case the computer will have. Minitower cases are ideal if the computer will be located under the desk, and they usually provide sufficient room inside the case for adding new drives and other components. However, you should take into account that having the computers on the floor makes access more difficult for technical support personnel and might require extra-long cables for the monitor, mouse, and keyboard. The horizontal cases in small form are better suited for placement on the user s desks and generally provide easier mainte nance access, but they tend to take up more room than most users would like.
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Tip One recent development in PC hardware that is useful in saving desktop space is inex pensive LCD (liquid crystal display) flat panel monitors. These monitors take up far less space than traditional CRT (cathode ray tube) models and, being lighter, are much easier to move around the desk as needed.
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In some offices, every user has a desk and every desk has a computer. However, this is not always the case. For example, your network might require kiosk-style worksta tions that different people use throughout the day. In this case, the network blueprint should specify a location for the kiosk that is convenient for users and provides other resources they need, such as desktop space and printer access. Some users do not need standard desktop workstations, and you should note these in the blueprint as well. People who use laptops or other portables as their primary com puters might need docking stations on their desks, or they might only need access to a cable jack providing a network connection.
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Locating Peripherals
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The locations of printers and other shared components are an important element of the network blueprint. In this case, the primary concern is ergonomics. Select locations for printers that provide convenient access for the users but are far enough away to avoid interference and discomfort. Some types of printers release ozone and other gases dur ing their operation that can be irritating or even toxic to some people. However, plac ing all printers in a closed room at the far end of the hall is likely to be inconvenient to everyone. When considering printer locations, you should take into account maintenance access to the machine and also proximity to expendable supplies, such as paper, toner, and ink. In some cases, you might also have to consider the physical security of the printer. For example, you might want to make sure that an expensive color printer with a high per-page printing cost be kept in a locked room so that only authorized personnel can use it.
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Planning a Network Topology
Locating Cables
The cable diagram is an important part of the network blueprint, because this part of the network is likely to be invisible once the construction of the network is completed. To maintain and troubleshoot the network infrastructure, technicians must know where the cables are located and how they are arranged. In addition to the cable runs themselves, the blueprint should also specify the locations of obstacles that cables must detour around and the location of each cable terminus, either at a wall plate or a patch panel. Part of selecting a network medium involves determining how the cables will be installed, based on the physical characteristics of the site. Typically, the cable installa tion for a medium-to-large office network is internal, meaning that the cables run inside walls and drop ceilings or sometimes under raised floors. In this type of instal lation, you should know the exact layout and construction of the site. If it is necessary to run cables down from the ceiling in the center of a room, the plan should note the exact location of a utility pole that will contain the cables. Creating the cabling diagram requires more than a simple floor plan of the site. To route the cables properly, the network designers must be aware of any obstacles that can interfere with the cable s installation or performance, and these obstacles often do not appear on standard floor plans. For example, when using copper-based cable such as UTP, you must know the locations of fluorescent light fixtures and other possible sources of electromagnetic interference so that the installer knows to route the cables around them. You should also document the locations of heating and air conditioning ducts, plenums, firewalls, and other obstacles that the installer might have to route cables around or through. In most cases, this requires the network designer to carefully examine the site. Another factor you should consider is that wiring diagrams are typically two-dimensional overviews of the site while cables often have to travel in three dimensions. For exam ple, when you install cable runs in a drop ceiling and terminate them at wall plates, the diagram should specify exactly where the cable goes down from the ceiling space into the wall. The diagram should also specify how high the wall plate should be off the floor and note whether the vertical wall itself contains any barriers that installers might have to work around. If the installation should include telephone as well as data cables, the plan should differentiate between the two and contain the codes that the installers will use to mark the cables so that they can be located later. A diagram for an external cable installation requires other details, particularly where the cables are to be secured and how such as using staples, raceways, or cable ties. Furniture location can also be significant, as can the cable color if you are attempting to match it to the walls. Finally, the diagram should contain a sufficient number of additional cable runs to provide for future expansion of the network.
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