Off the Record in VB.NET

Generator DataMatrix in VB.NET Off the Record

Off the Record
Generate ECC200 In VB.NET
Using Barcode generator for .NET Control to generate, create ECC200 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
DataMatrix Scanner In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode decoder for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
In addition to Classes A through C, there are two additional address classes, Class D and Class E. The IANA has allocated Class D addresses for use as multicast identifiers. A multicast address identifies a group of computers on a network, all of which possess a similar trait. Multicast addresses enable TCP/IP applications to send traffic to computers that perform specific functions (such as all the routers on the network), even if they are located on different subnets. Class E addresses are defined as experimental and are as yet unused.
Painting Barcode In VB.NET
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Decoder In VB.NET
Using Barcode reader for .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Understanding Subnetting
Printing Data Matrix ECC200 In C#
Using Barcode printer for .NET Control to generate, create ECC200 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Printing ECC200 In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode encoder for ASP.NET Control to generate, create DataMatrix image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Whether you obtain a registered network address from your ISP or you use one of the private IP address ranges designated by the IANA, you are free to subnet that address as needed. Subnetting is the process of creating individual network addresses out of a larger network address. To create a subnet, you borrow some host identifier bits from a network address and use them to create a subnet identifier. You can then increment the value of the subnet identifier to create multiple subnets, and increment what s left of the host identifier to create individual hosts on each subnet. Subnetting is an essential part of the IP addressing process, as you can probably tell when you study the table of IP address classes shown earlier in this lesson. There are
DataMatrix Maker In .NET
Using Barcode generator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Generating EAN-13 Supplement 5 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create EAN 13 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
2-28
UPC Symbol Drawer In VB.NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create UPC-A Supplement 5 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Print PDF417 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode printer for .NET framework Control to generate, create PDF-417 2d barcode image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
2
Matrix Barcode Generator In VB.NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create Matrix 2D Barcode image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Ames Code Generation In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create Ames code image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Planning a TCP/IP Network Infrastructure
Code 128 Code Set A Printer In None
Using Barcode encoder for Software Control to generate, create Code-128 image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Create GS1 128 In .NET
Using Barcode generation for ASP.NET Control to generate, create GS1-128 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
only 126 Class A network addresses available in the entire IP address space, for exam ple, and each one of those addresses supports more than 16 million hosts. There are some very large network installations in this world, but none of them have as many as 16 million computers. Assigning an entire Class A network address to a particular orga nization for its exclusive use would therefore be extremely wasteful if subnetting was not involved. In a standard Class A address, the network address is the first 8 bits, which in decimal form translates to the first quad in the address. For example, 10.0.0.0 is an example of a Class A address, and it would use a subnet mask value of 255.0.0.0. Because a Class A address has 24 host identifier bits, far more than are needed for any single network, it is no prob lem to borrow some of those bits to create a subnet identifier. If you decide to borrow 8 bits for the subnet identifier, the breakdown of the address changes as shown in Figure 26. You also change the subnet mask of the address to 255.255.0.0 because the primary function of the mask is to specify where in the IP address the host identifier begins.
EAN-13 Drawer In Java
Using Barcode maker for BIRT Control to generate, create EAN13 image in BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Encode Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode creator for VS .NET Control to generate, create barcode image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
8 16 24
Code-39 Maker In None
Using Barcode generation for Software Control to generate, create Code-39 image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Paint Code 39 In Java
Using Barcode generator for Android Control to generate, create Code 39 Extended image in Android applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Class A
Code-39 Creation In Java
Using Barcode encoder for Java Control to generate, create USS Code 39 image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Bar Code Generation In Java
Using Barcode printer for BIRT Control to generate, create bar code image in Eclipse BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Network Identifier
Host Identifier
Subnetted Class A
Network Identifier
Subnet Identifier
Host Identifier
Figure 2-6 Subnetting a Class A address
To use the subnetted Class A address, you increment the subnet identifier and the host identifier separately. For example, to create your first subnet, you give the subnet iden tifier a value of one. This means that the network address for this subnet is 10.1.0.0. You now have 16 bits left for the host identifier, which means you can create up to 65,534 host addresses in that one subnet (216 2=65,534). The first host address in this subnet is therefore 10.1.0.1. This is the IP address value you use to configure the first computer in the subnet, along with the subnet mask value of 255.255.0.0. The second address in the subnet is 10.1.0.2, and the next addresses can proceed from 10.1.0.3 all the way to 10.1.255.254, utilizing all 16 bits of the host identifier. To create the second subnet, you simply increment the subnet identifier value again, giving you a network address of 10.2.0.0 and IP addresses ranging from 10.2.0.1 to 10.2.255.254. Because you have allocated 8 bits to the subnet identifier, you can create up to 254 subnets on this network (28 2=254). The network address for the last subnet would be 10.254.0.0, with the IP addresses in that subnet ranging from 10.254.0.1 to 10.254.255.254.
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.