TRY IT NOW Go ahead and try any or all of these comparisons. Type them in VB.NET

Printer Data Matrix 2d barcode in VB.NET TRY IT NOW Go ahead and try any or all of these comparisons. Type them

TRY IT NOW Go ahead and try any or all of these comparisons. Type them
Data Matrix ECC200 Encoder In VB.NET
Using Barcode maker for .NET Control to generate, create Data Matrix ECC200 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Data Matrix Reader In VB.NET
Using Barcode decoder for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
on a line and hit Return, like 5 -eq 5, and see what you get.
Paint PDF 417 In VB.NET
Using Barcode encoder for VS .NET Control to generate, create PDF 417 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
2D Barcode Drawer In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode drawer for VS .NET Control to generate, create Matrix Barcode image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Above and beyond
Data Matrix ECC200 Maker In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Print Code-39 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Code39 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
If a cmdlet doesn t use the preceding PowerShell-style comparison operators, it probably uses the more traditional, programming language--style comparison operators that you might remember from high school or college (or even your daily work!):
GS1 - 13 Maker In VB.NET
Using Barcode creator for .NET framework Control to generate, create UPC - 13 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Leitcode Maker In VB.NET
Using Barcode creator for Visual Studio .NET Control to generate, create Leitcode image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
= equality <> inequality <= less than or equal to >= greater than or equal to > greater than < less than
Data Matrix ECC200 Drawer In .NET
Using Barcode encoder for Reporting Service Control to generate, create Data Matrix 2d barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Recognize Data Matrix ECC200 In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
If Boolean operators are supported, they re usually the words AND and OR; some cmdlets may support operators such as LIKE as well. You ll find support for all of these operators in the -filter parameter of Get-WmiObject, for example, and I ll repeat this list when we discuss that cmdlet in chapter 11. Every cmdlet s designers get to pick how (and if) they ll handle filtering; you can often get examples of what they decided to do by reviewing the cmdlet s full help, including the usage examples near the end of the help file.
Paint QR-Code In None
Using Barcode creation for Software Control to generate, create QR image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Scan Barcode In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode reader for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Filtering objects out of the pipeline
UCC.EAN - 128 Generation In None
Using Barcode generator for Office Excel Control to generate, create EAN / UCC - 13 image in Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Maker In Objective-C
Using Barcode generator for iPhone Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPhone applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Once you ve written a comparison, where do you use it Well, using the comparison language I just outlined, you can use it with the -filter parameter of some cmdlets, perhaps most notably the ActiveDirectory module s Get- cmdlets. You can also use it with the shell s generic filtering cmdlet, Where-Object. For example, want to get rid of all but the running services
Data Matrix 2d Barcode Creator In Java
Using Barcode drawer for BIRT Control to generate, create Data Matrix image in BIRT reports applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Printer In None
Using Barcode maker for Excel Control to generate, create Barcode image in Office Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Get-Service | Where-Object -filter { $_.Status -eq 'Running' }
Barcode Recognizer In Java
Using Barcode scanner for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code128 Creator In None
Using Barcode maker for Software Control to generate, create Code 128 Code Set C image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The -filter parameter is positional, so you ll often see this typed without it, and with the alias Where:
Barcode Maker In Objective-C
Using Barcode maker for iPad Control to generate, create Barcode image in iPad applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Barcode Encoder In None
Using Barcode printer for Software Control to generate, create Barcode image in Software applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Get-Service | Where { $_.Status -eq 'Running' }
The iterative command-line model
If you get used to reading that aloud, it sounds sensible: where status equals running. Here s how it works: When you pipe objects to Where-Object, it examines each one of them using its filter. It places one object at a time into the $_ placeholder and then runs the comparison to see if it s True or False. If it s False, the object is dropped from the pipeline. If the comparison is True, the object is piped out of Where-Object to the next cmdlet in the pipeline. In this case, the next cmdlet is OutDefault, which is always at the end of the pipeline (as we discussed in chapter 8) and which kicks off the formatting process to display your output. That $_ placeholder is a special creature: you ve seen it used before (in chapters 7 and 8), and you ll see it in only one or two more contexts. You can only use this placeholder in the specific places where PowerShell looks for it, and this happens to be one of those places. As you learned in chapters 7 and 8, the period tells the shell that we re not comparing the entire object, but rather just one of its properties, Status. Hopefully, you re starting to see where Gm comes in handy, as it gives you a quick and easy way to discover what properties an object has, so that you can turn around and use those properties in a comparison like this one. Always keep in mind that the column headers in PowerShell s final output don t always reflect the actual property names. For example, run Get-Process and you ll see a column like PM(MB); run GetProcess | Gm and you ll see that the actual property name is PM. That s an important distinction: always verify property names using Gm, not a Format- cmdlet.
The iterative command-line model
I want to go on a brief tangent with you and talk about what I call the PowerShell Iterative Command-Line Model, or PSICLM. There s no reason for it to have an acronym, but it s fun to try and pronounce it. The idea here is that you don t need to construct these large, complex command lines all at once and entirely from scratch. Start small. Let s say I want to measure the amount of virtual memory being used by the ten most virtual memory hungry processes. But if PowerShell itself is one of those processes, I don t want it included in the calculation. Let s take a quick inventory of what I need to do:
Get processes Get rid of everything that s PowerShell Sort them by virtual memory Only keep the top 10 or bottom 10, depending on how I sorted them Add up the virtual memory for whatever is left
I believe you know how to do the first three of those. The fourth is accomplished with your old friend, Select-Object. Take a moment and read the help for Select-Object. Can you see any parameters that would enable you to keep just the first or last number of objects in a collection
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.