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Approaching DAG designs
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If the primary datacenter suffers a complete failure, the workload will be transferred automatically to the secondary datacenter and the RPC Client Access Layer on the CAS servers in the secondary datacenter will take on transferred client connections and redirect the connections to the database copies on the servers in the secondary center. This might not be the desired behavior, as the available network might not be sufficient to handle client traffic in addition to replication traffic and any other application load generated between the two datacenters. In this case, we can activation block the databases in the secondary datacenter and accept that a delay will occur before we can reactivate a database copy should both copies of a database in the primary datacenter fail. Two database copies are still available in the secondary datacenter, so a further storage failure can still be tolerated, including a failure that takes out a complete server. If more than one storage failure is experienced, it could remove service to one or more databases depending on the distribution of the database copies. However, such a series of failures following a complete datacenter outage is highly unlikely and could only be considered to be the height of bad luck. In addition to the 50 TB space needed for mailbox databases, we should add 40 percent to account for the CI catalogs and transaction logs for the databases plus associated headroom for growth, maintenance, and to ensure that no disk is ever completely full. The design goal is therefore 70 TB 4 copies, or 280 TB. Note that this figure accounts for mailboxes that are completely full. It is unlikely that a production environment will operate in a state where all mailboxes are full, especially with a generous 2 GB quota. An average mailbox might be half full, so you could plan to provide 140 TB of storage initially and then grow over time. Archive mailboxes are a complicating factor, as they can be held in the same database as the primary mailbox and could therefore double the storage requirement. Of course, SP1 allows you to split primary and archive mailboxes across different databases, so it is possible that your design might use dedicated databases for archive mailboxes that are managed in a different manner from the databases that hold primary mailboxes. Each of the mailbox databases is a maximum of 500 GB. Adding 20 percent for the CI catalog and transaction logs gives 700 GB, which means that a single database and its associated files will fit comfortably on a single 1 TB disk and also allow space for growth.
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running Exchange 2010 Enterprise Edition can accommodate many more than five active databases, and a larger number of smaller databases allows more flexibility in distributing I/O load across available disks and transferring load following a server outage. In addition, smaller databases allow us to grow if necessary to accommodate larger mailbox quotas or archive mailboxes without creating the requirement to move mailboxes around. We will therefore set our maximum database size to 500 GB (250 mailboxes) and decide that the server will host 20 active databases. Each server will also host 20 copy databases from other servers. In the event of a server failure, the work for five databases (1,250 mailboxes) will be transferred to each of the four remaining servers. We will configure the DAG to limit the number of active databases per server to 25 to enforce the desired 6,250 mailbox limit.
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8 Exchange s Search for High Availability
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However, this is a simplistic calculation as the storage has to be able to satisfy the I/O demand as well. Microsoft s performance guidelines use 0.2 I/O operations per second per mailbox. This figure is highly dependent on user work habits and is influenced by the number of items and folders in user mailboxes. To be safe, we can use a figure of 0.25 I/O operations per second, so a mailbox database with 250 mailboxes generates a demand of 62.5 I/O operations per second at peak load, assuming that all of the users are concurrently active. The calculations do not take archive mailboxes or features such as an extended deleted items retention period or litigation hold into account. The exact storage design that is implemented will have to take these factors into account. On a pragmatic level, the storage design will be highly influenced by the existing storage architecture, current available storage products, and other requirements such as the backup regime. For example, an organization that uses storage area network (SAN) storage for Exchange 2007 might want to extend its use for Exchange 2010 and will therefore make the necessary adjustments to accommodate the storage and I/O requirements of 100 active databases and 100 copy databases plus the demands of other applications that are run on the mailbox and other servers in each datacenter. On the other hand, an organization might want to take advantage of the lower I/O demand of Exchange 2010 to move to a lower cost JBOD ( just a bunch of disks)-based storage design, especially if they have an eye on expanding mailbox quota from 2 GB to a higher value in future. The storage calculators and other sizing tools that are available from hardware vendors and Microsoft provide invaluable assistance to system designers, as they calculate the basic foundation for a storage design that has to deliver a certain amount of raw storage and I/O capabilities. In any but the simplest deployment, you shouldn t expect these calculators to provide the most effective and cost-efficient storage design. Instead, treat the output from the sizing tools as a good starting point and then give the data to a storage expert to have her fine-tune the design to meet your exact requirements. One idea is to provide the output from the sizing tools to storage vendors and invite them to state how their products will deliver the necessary performance, capacity, security, and resilience. Apart from the potential of getting some free advice from vendor storage specialists in the responses that you receive, you might benefit from competitively priced storage packages specially designed for Exchange 2010 that might be an off-the-shelf solution for many designs. In addition, the vendors can brief you on new storage and other technology with capabilities that might not be captured in the current generation of sizing tools.
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