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Understand the process of creating a business continuity plan
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List some of the fault-tolerance measures you can take to keep your business going in an emergency
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To be effective, business continuity management (BCM) must transcend the technological concerns of the IT department and involve the entire company from the top down. Although a relatively minor disaster, such as a hard disk failure in a server, can cause the company to cease operations for a time, the object of BCM is to plan contingencies for truly catastrophic occurrences in which company resources of many different types can be affected. As an example, what would you do if the building housing your company's offices was destroyed by a tornado in the middle of a workday If your IT department has a properly implemented disaster recovery plan, you have backup copies of your vital company data stored offsite, and perhaps even servers located in different cities or stored in unaffected locations. However, before the business can be fully operational again, you might need to find new office space, and then replace dozens of desktop workstations, the telephone system, and hundreds of mundane items such as office furniture, stationery, and supplies. In a worst case scenario, you might even have to find replacement personnel. In the aftermath of a major disaster, people are likely to be overwhelmed by the enormity of the tasks that confront them. Even if they are able to overcome the emotional shock of such an event, they might have a difficult time focusing on what has to be done. The idea behind BCM is to have a comprehensive plan worked out in advance that specifies what has to be done to keep the business operational, who will do what when disaster occurs, and how replacement materials will be obtained. Creating a Business Continuity Plan The process of creating a business continuity plan must be sponsored by individuals at the highest levels of the company and encompass the entire operation, not just the IT department. The primary steps of the initial planning phase should include the following: Identify the mission-critical processes that the business must perform to continue operating. Every business consists of multiple processes that together enable the company to produce a product or service and be compensated for it. By listing these separate processes, you can more easily prioritize the company's activities and identify the resources you need to proceed.
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Identify all of the resources required for the mission-critical processes to operate. The list of resources for each process should include raw materials, tools and other equipment, facilities, fixtures, utilities, and personnel; in short, it comprises everything necessary for the process to continue.
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Rate the relative importance of the mission-critical processes to the continuing operation of the
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business. Depending on the nature of the business, your first priority might be manufacturing your product, or it might be taking orders from customers. In any case, there will be certain processes that must continue uninterrupted if the business is to survive, and others that can withstand a temporary interruption.
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Decide on a course of action to be undertaken for each mission-critical process to plan for an interruption. For crucial processes, the course of action might include moving the process to a branch office or activating a fallback facility with backup equipment prepared for such an eventuality. For less crucial processes, the company might choose to purchase insurance to cover the financial losses resulting from the interruption, rather than take steps to maintain productivity. This can protect the company against immediate financial losses, but the company's reputation can still be damaged. For some processes, the chosen course of action might be no action at all.
The planning phase of the business continuity plan is by far the most complex part of the process. Once you have decided what you are going to do and how, implementing the plan is relatively easy. For more comprehensive information on business continuity planning, you might want to consult the ISO 17799 document, published by the International Organization for Standardization. This document is available for purchase at a href="http://www.iso-17799.com" target="_window2">http://www.iso-17799.com. Implementing Business Continuity Preparations For some of the processes that are essential to the survival of your business, your plan probably calls for the preparation of fallbacks that you can use if your site is damaged. Depending on the nature of your business, on the importance of the process, and your budget, these fallbacks can range from simple backups of your data to preparations for an alternative site where you can conduct business. Backups As discussed in Lesson 1 of this chapter, backing up your data is the most fundamental type of business continuity measure. Virtually every resource used by your business can be replaced, with sufficient time and money, except for your data. To prepare for possible disaster, you should back up your data on a regular basis (preferably daily) and make arrangements to store a copy of the data offsite. High Availability and Fault Tolerance High availability and fault-tolerance mechanisms are measures that you can take to keep your business operating in the event of a systems failure. Data availability technologies such as a redundant array of independent disks (RAID) enable a server to continue operating without data loss when a hard disk fails. It is also possible to build more comprehensive fault-tolerant systems, such as clustered servers that share a client load, but if one server fails for any reason, the other ones continue operating and take up the slack. Obviously, these systems can do little good if all of the components are located at the same site, and the entire building is destroyed by a fire or other disaster. For this reason, it is also possible to place mirrored servers at distant locations, connected by a wide are network (WAN) link. For some businesses, having a branch office in another city is a convenient way to create a fault-tolerant organization. You can have not only duplicate computers and technological components at the other site,
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