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Describe different types of authentication
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Describe Kerberos authentication
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Discuss implications of combining authentication methods
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Estimated lesson time: 35 minutes
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Authentication requires a user to provide some proof or credential that represents something they know,
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something they have, or something they are before allowing access to your company's resources. Examples of each of these categories include the following: Something you know. A password or personal identification number (PIN) Something you have. A smart card or other physical object Something you are. A thumbprint or other biometrics
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The authentication process can be a one-way process, where only the user's credentials are authenticated, or a mutual authentication process, in which both the user and the resource authenticate to each other. To require strong authentication, you must understand what authentication methods are available, their strengths and weaknesses, and how to combine those methods to provide strong authentication. User Name and Password Authentication User name and password authentication are common methods used to validate that people are who they say they are. With this, a user is typically presented with a dialog box and must provide his or her user name and password. The user name is typically visible on the screen and is handled as cleartext, whereas the password is typically masked on the screen and is encrypted. If the authentication is performed locally, for instance when a user logs on to a stand-alone computer, there could be a process running that intercepts or records the user name and password. This could provide a hacker with the information needed to gain access to a single computer or your entire network.
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If the authentication process is centralized, for instance when a user logs on to a network, then the user name and password are sent to a different computer that is responsible for authenticating users and providing them credentials that can be used to access networked resources available on that network.
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When possible, you should require the user to have a user name and complex password rather than a simple password, and it should be enforced by the operating system or network operating system in use. Examples of a simple password include a person's first name, last name, birthday, phone number, or a common word. Although these might appear to be difficult to guess, using today's computing technology, they can be broken quickly. As described in 4, a complex password includes uppercase, lowercase, and numeric characters, symbols, and punctuation. Even when numbers are used to replace letters, there are modified dictionary password-cracking programs available that can replace standard characters with common symbols and numbers and then run against a password. For example, if you
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want to use a password like football and choose footba11, a password-cracking program may quickly decipher your password because it involves a simple replacement. However, the password Pho0tB@!1 is much more difficult for a password-cracking program to decipher. Because example passwords are often added to password-cracking programs, you should not use any passwords you see printed in this or any other publication. Although you can force a user to set a difficult password and require the user to memorize the password (as opposed to writing it down), the user might feel the password is too difficult to remember and will write it down on a piece of paper located near his or her desk or under the keyboard. Some best practices to enforce with passwords include the following: Force the users to have passwords that include uppercase and lowercase letters, symbols, and punctuation. Do not allow passwords that are all alphabetic or numeric characters.
Force the users to change passwords every 30 to 42 days. If it appears that a password has been compromised, force the user to change the password immediately. For example, if a single user account is used to log on to multiple workstations simultaneously or within a short time interval, you might suspect that the account is compromised. Other potential indications that a user account is compromised include logons at unusual hours, attempts to access restricted resources, and multiple connections to resources that a user would not typically utilize.
Do not allow users to use the same password again. If available, enable the histories function for passwords and do not allow the user to use the same password for at least five times. The longer the history the better. This, in concert with not allowing the user to change passwords too often, deters a user from quickly cycling through passwords to use the same one.
Create a policy that does not allow users to write their passwords down. This is a written policy and cannot be enforced programmatically, but, if tied to disciplinary actions, it can deter users from recording their passwords.
Create a policy that does not allow users to share their passwords with anyone, including help desk personnel. This policy cannot be enforced programmatically, but, if tied to disciplinary actions, it can also deter users.
Provide user education on social engineering (discussed in 11, "Incident Detection and Response"), strong password creation, and the network security breaches that can occur if written policies are not followed.
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