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Smart Client Architecture and Design Guide
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You should use the service-oriented approach when: You want to decouple the client and server to allow independent versioning and deployment. You require more control and flexibility over data reconciliation issues. You have the developer expertise to write more advanced application infrastructure code. You require a lightweight client footprint. You are able to structure your application into a service-oriented architecture. You require specific business functionality (for example, custom business rules and processing, flexible reconciliation, and so on). You need control over the schema of data stored on the client and flexibility that might be different from the server. Your application interacts with multiple or disparate services (for example, multiple Web services or services through Message Queuing, Web services, or RPC mechanisms). You need a custom security scheme. Your application operates in an Internet or extranet environment. While both the data-centric and service-oriented approaches are valid architectural approaches, many smart client applications are not able to support full relational database instances on the client. In such cases, you should adopt a service-oriented approach and ensure that you have the appropriate infrastructure in place to handle issues such as data caching and conflict detection and resolution. For this reason, the remainder of this chapter focuses on the issues that smart client developers need to consider when implementing a service-oriented approach.
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4: Occasionally Connected Smart Clients
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Designing Occasionally Connected Smart Client Applications Using a Service-Oriented Approach
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As you design your occasionally connected smart clients using a service-oriented approach, there are a number of issues that you need to address. These include: Favoring asynchronous communication Minimizing complex network interactions Adding data caching capabilities Managing connections Designing a store-and-forward mechanism Managing data and business rule conflicts Interacting with create, read, update, delete (CRUD) like Web services Using a task-based approach Handling dependencies This section discusses these issues in more detail:
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Favoring Asynchronous Communication
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Applications use one of two methods of communication when interacting with data and services located on the network: Synchronous communication. The application is designed to expect a response before it continues processing (for example, synchronous RPC communication). Asynchronous communication. The application communicates by using a message bus or some other message-based transport, and expects a delay between the request and any response or expects no response at all.
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Note: In this guide, synchronous communication refers to all communication that expects a response before processing can continue, even if the synchronous call is carried out on a separate background thread.
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If you are designing a new smart client application, you should ensure that it primarily uses asynchronous communication when interacting with data and services located on the network. Applications that are architected to expect a delay between the request and a response are well-suited to occasionally connected use, as long as the application provides significant and useful functionality while waiting for a response and does not prevent a user from carrying on with his or her work if the response is delayed.
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Smart Client Architecture and Design Guide
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When the application is not connected to network resources, you can store requests locally and send them to the remote service when the application reconnects. In both the offline and online cases, because the application is not expecting an immediate response to a request, the user is not prevented from continuing to use the application and can continue working. Applications that use synchronous communication, even on a background thread, are not well suited to be occasionally connected. You should therefore minimize the use of synchronous communications in your smart clients. If you are redesigning an application that uses synchronous communication to be a smart client, you should ensure that it adopts a more asynchronous communication model so that it can function offline. However, in many cases you can implement synchronous-like communication on top of an asynchronous infrastructure (known as the sync-onasync model) so that application design changes can be kept to a minimum. Architecting your applications to use asynchronous communication can bring you benefits that go beyond occasionally connected use. Most applications designed for asynchronous communication are more flexible than those that use synchronous communications. For example, an asynchronous application can be shut down part way through a task without affecting the processing of requests or responses when it starts again. In most cases, you do not need to implement both synchronous and asynchronous behavior in an application for online and offline usage. An asynchronous behavior is suitable for both online and offline use; requests are processed in near real time when the application is online.
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