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Verbalize and Capture Performance Requirements and Goals
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Although it is generally desirable to conduct this activity early in the software development life cycle, it is also valuable to revisit this activity periodically throughout the project. No matter how well you conduct this activity, contracts, perceptions, business drivers, and priorities change as new information becomes available. Keep this in mind as you traverse the project life cycle. For example, if you find out that the terms of a contract have changed while you are presenting what you believe is your final report, it will appear as though your project was never based on the terms of the initial contract. Throughout this activity, it is important to distinguishing between requirements and goals (see Terminology above). Identifying requirements is far from difficult. To determine requirements, focus on contracts and legally binding agreements or standards related to the software under development, and get the executive stakeholders to commit to any performance conditions that will cause them to refuse to release the software into production. The resulting criteria may or may not be related to any specific business scenario or condition. If they are, however, you must ensure that those scenarios or conditions are included in your performance testing. Performance goals are more challenging to capture and to subsequently quantify, which is why it is important to treat the capture and quantification as separate activities. An extremely common mistake related to performance testing is to begin quantification without first verbalizing the goals subjectively or qualitatively.
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Review Project Documentation and Related Contracts
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This activity is conceptually straightforward. Regulatory and compliance documents may be challenging to obtain because they often are not readily available for review by nonexecutives. Even so, it is important to review these standards. The specific language and context of any statement related to testing is critical to determining a compliant process. For example, the difference between transactions will and on average, transactions will is tremendous. The first case implies that every transaction will comply every single time. The second case is completely ambiguous, as becomes obvious when you try to quantify these criteria.
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Frequently, the most important performance-related statements can be found in vision and marketing documents. Vision documents often hold subjective performance goals such as at least as fast as the previous release, able to support a growing customer base, and performance consistent with the market. Marketing documents, however, are notorious for containing unintentional performance requirements. Any declaration made in a publicly available marketing statement is legally binding in the United States, which makes every claim about performance (or anything else) a nonnegotiable requirement. This is not well-known across the software industry and has caused significant challenges when marketing materials included words like fast, instant, and market-leading performance. For each item, the terms must be publicly and reasonably defined and supported which is where performance testing comes in. To complete this activity, all you need to do is highlight statements in these published materials that are even loosely related to the application s speed, scalability, and/or stability and set them aside until you are ready to quantify them. Alternatively, you could transpose these statements directly into your requirements-management system just as they are, with the understanding that they are likely to be revised later.
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Interview Stakeholders Who Will Influence the Go Live Decision
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Stakeholders always have an opinion when it comes to performance, and frequently they express those opinions in terms that appear to be already quantified and absolute, although they are rarely well understood. The key to interviewing stakeholders is not only to capture their statements, but also to determine the intent behind those statements. For example, a stakeholder with a background in telecommunications who may say that she expects the application to have five 9s of availability probably does not understand that this equates to the near-impossible standard of a Web site being unavailable for roughly five minutes per year (or roughly one second per day). The truth is that many Web sites could be down for an hour per day, if it is the right hour, without customers even noticing. In fact, it is hard to imagine that Web users would notice a one-second delay, even if it did happen once a day. So while one second of mid-conversation silence each day on a land line is absolutely unacceptable to users, it is probably an unnecessarily strict standard for a Web site. The key is to ask good questions in order to determine the real intent behind statements stakeholders make related to performance. The following are some sample starting questions, along with potential follow-up questions, to help you capture the intent of the stakeholder: How do you expect this application to perform relative to other similar applications/Web sites How much better Ten percent Noticeably Dramatically Which application/Web site in particular exhibits the kind of performance you would like this application/Website to have You said x seconds; how did you decide on that number and what does it indicate to you
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How much disruption are you willing to accept due to downtime Does that include scheduled maintenance that users are notified about beforehand Does it matter if the user simply cannot access the Web site/application, or if they are given a message acknowledging that the site is down What if the users can still accomplish their tasks, but the speed is degraded during downtime How do you expect the application/Web site to respond to unexpectedly high traffic volumes Do you prefer dramatic performance degradation for all users or a system is temporarily unavailable, please try again later message for all users in excess of the supported volume Is it more important to you that the application/Web site demonstrates consistent performance, or variable performance that may be up to 50 percent faster or slower than average based on current usage volume
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To complete this activity, it is most important to record the questions and the answers and not quantify the answers or comment on them unless the stakeholder specifically asks you to explain. The general rule is to ask questions that have answers that do not specifically require quantifications, and to follow up with questions that help you qualify the initial responses subjectively. If the stakeholder does provide numbers, take note of them, but do not assume that they are the right numbers.
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