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SQL Server writes by the user sessions occur only in the buffer cache. When a change is made, the buffer is modified in the buffer cache. If the data is not already in the cache, it will be read into cache from disk. As a change is made and a COMMIT operation is executed, a log write will occur specifying the changes that have been made, and then the COMMIT operation will complete. The user session will not wait on that data to be written out to disk before proceeding. The changed data will be written out at a later time via either the lazy writer process or the checkpoint process. Checkpoints and the lazy writer will be discussed in more detail in 14, Backup Fundamentals .
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User sessions never wait on database writes to complete. The exception is the transaction log. In other words, users wait on reads but not on writes. Therefore, read performance is more important than write performance for the user community s usability experience.
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The transaction log is used primarily for restoring the database in the event of a data failure and to recover in the event of an instance failure. Whenever a commit operation has been initiated, a commit record must be written into the transaction log before that statement can complete. For this reason, the write performance (mostly sequential) of the transaction log is very important.
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Perhaps the most commonly overlooked I/O considerations for SQL Server are backup and recovery. With most SQL Server systems there is only a small window of opportunity for performing backups. This time must be optimized. Earlier in this chapter you saw illustrations of how a slow I/O subsystem can cause SQL query performance problems. In addition, when performing backups, you must consider not only the I/O performance of the SQL Server database but the network performance and the performance of the disk partition to which you are backing up. The performance of the disk partition to which you are backing up is often overlooked, which can cause backup performance problems. In addition, network throughput can also be an issue. These issues will also be covered in 14 and 15, Restoring Data.
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As you saw earlier in this chapter, you should configure your I/O system properly to avoid overloading it. Overloading the I/O subsystem causes the I/O latency to increase and degrade SQL Server performance. In this section, you will learn how to build a SQL Server system that can perform within the limitations of your subsystem. The first part of this configuration exercise shows you how to determine the I/O requirements of your system. Then you will plan and create your system.
Determine I/O Requirements
Determining the I/O requirements of a system that exists as only a concept can be difficult if not impossible. However, if you can t determine the I/O requirements from hard data, you might be able to gather enough data to make an educated guess. In either case, building an I/O subsystem that cannot expand is not a good idea. Always leave some room for required increases in capacity and performance because sooner or later you will need them.
4
I/O Subsystem Planning and RAID Configuration
You should design your system to meet a set of minimum requirements based on the amount of space that you need for data storage and on the level of performance you need. In the next sections, you will see how to determine how many disks these factors require.
Space
Determining the space required by your SQL Server database is easy compared to determining the performance requirements. The amount of space is equal to the sum of the following:
Space required for data Space required for indexes Space required for temporary data Space required for the transaction log
The space required for data must include enough space to handle data that is added to your database. Your business and your customers will dictate, to a large degree, the amount by which your database will grow. To determine your system s growth rate, check your existing database on a regular basis and calculate the size differences in the amount of space used in it. Calculate this growth rate over several months to determine trends. You might be surprised by the rate at which your data is growing. In a system without any history, you can estimate the amount of growth by taking the number of product orders, inventory items, and so on, and multiplying that by the estimated row size. Doing this for several periods (perhaps months or years) will give you a rough idea of the rate at which the data files will grow. This will not tell you how much your indexes will grow. The amount of index space per data row depends on how the index is constructed and on the amount of data. A complex index takes more space per row of data than a simple index. It is then up to you and your management to determine whether your system should be able to handle growth for two years, five years, or longer. This will allow you to determine how to configure your I/O subsystem for space. Once you have determined the amount of data in the database, the size of the indexes, the amount of temporary database space required, and the rate of growth, you can determine how much disk space is required. You must then take into account the effects of using RAID fault tolerance. Remember, RAID-1 or RAID-10 (data mirroring) takes up half the disk space of the physical disk drives. RAID-5 takes up the disk space of one disk of the array. Remember also that the disk size that the manufacturer provides is unformatted space. An unformatted disk drive that is labeled as a 9.1-GB disk is actually an 8.6-GB disk when formatted. Once you have calculated the amount of space currently required and estimated the amount of growth space required, you must then move to the next
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