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Every Windows 2000 (or Windows Server 2003) domain and every Windows XP Professional based computer has a DNS name. Thus, domains and computers are represented both as Active Directory objects and as DNS nodes. (A node in the DNS hierarchy represents a domain or a computer.) When you add a computer to a Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003 domain, you need to specify the FQDN, consisting of the computer name and domain name. This information is provided when you add the computer account to the domain during or after initial Windows XP Professional Setup. For more information about adding Windows XP Professional based clients to a Windows 2000 or Windows Server 2003 domain, see Joining the Network Environment later in this chapter.
Part IV:
Networking
Although the two namespaces can share an identical domain structure, it is important to understand that they are not the same namespace. Each stores different data and therefore manages different objects. DNS stores zones and resource records, and Active Directory stores domains and domain objects. Note
Not every client needs to be visible to the Internet and not every company that wants to implement Active Directory needs to be on the Internet.
For more information about configuring the DNS client, see 24, Configuring IP Addressing and Name Resolution. For more conceptual information about DNS and the Windows 2000 DNS service, see Introduction to DNS and Windows 2000 DNS in the Microsoft Windows 2000 Server TCP/IP Core Networking Guide.
Windows NT 4.0 Compatibility
In addition to being able to use Active Directory domain controllers, Windows XP Professional based computers can access domain controllers used in Windows NT 4.0 domains. Like Active Directory, the Windows NT 4.0 account database includes the following two types of accounts in its domain environment:
Computer accounts. Windows NT 4.0 based, Windows 2000 based, and Windows XP Professional based computers that can access the domain. User accounts.
Users who can access the domain.
Shared resources defined within the domain are associated with accounts by using ACEs, which determine the permissions to domain resources such as shared files and printers. A Windows XP Professional based computer can access objects stored in a Windows NT account database without modification. Typically, a Windows XP Professional based computer uses Kerberos V5 authentication to find a Windows 2000 based or Windows Server 2003 based domain controller. A Windows XP Professional based computer that is authenticating against a Windows NT 4.0 domain controller uses NTLM as its security protocol. For information about Kerberos V5 authentication, see Account Authentication later in this chapter.
Account Authentication
Typically, a computer and its stored information must be protected from unauthorized access. Windows XP Professional secures the computer by using account authentication, which can prevent a user from accessing a computer or domain. Account authentication is the process of confirming the identity of a user by verifying a user s login name and password or smartcard information against data stored in an account database either locally or on a domain controller. After authentication identifies the user, the user is granted access to a specific set of network
23:
Connecting Clients to Windows Networks
resources based on permissions. Authorization takes place by means of the mechanism of access control, using access control lists (ACLs), which define permissions on file systems, network file and print shares, and entries in the account database. For more information about account authentication, see 16, Understanding Logon and Authentication.
Authentication Methods
Account authentication is performed by one of the following two methods:
Authentication by the local account database, for computers in workgroups and standalone computers. Authentication by a domain account database located on a domain controller, for computers in a domain.
Windows XP Professional uses the Kerberos V5 authentication protocol as the default authentication method for domain access and NTLM for local access. When you log on to an Active Directory domain, Windows XP Professional attempts to use Kerberos V5 security procedures as the primary source of user authentication, searching for the Kerberos Key Distribution Center (KDC) service on the domain controller. KDC is the account authentication service that runs on all Windows 2000 based and Windows Server 2003 based domain controllers. In a Windows NT 4.0 environment, Windows 2000 and Windows XP Professional use NTLM to authenticate to the domain s Windows NT Security Accounts Manager (SAM) database on a Windows NT based domain controller. When users log on locally to a workstation or to a stand-alone or member server, authentication to the local database occurs by way of NTLM rather than by way of the Kerberos V5 protocol. The local accounts database on Windows XP Professional based and Windows 2000 based computers is a SAM database, similar to the database used in Windows NT 4.0 and earlier.
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