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Securing Network Protocols
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One of the most common techniques for violating security and privacy on networks involves intercepting transmissions sent via unencrypted protocols. It s critical to avoid sending personal information, such as credit card numbers, across the network in the clear. It s also important to avoid sending user names and passwords across the network in clear text because a hacker that intercepts them can use the user names and passwords to log on to systems and initiate local attacks or even take complete control. The following practices will help to minimize this threat. Encrypt wireless network traffic whenever possible When using wireless communications, use Wireless Encryption Protocol (WEP) with as large a key length as possible. WEP is hardly perfect because fundamental flaws in WEP s key design allow it to be penetrated by a dedicated hacker with sufficient computing resources. Additionally, it only encrypts communication between wireless network adapters and wireless access points (or between adapters when configured in ad hoc mode). As soon as traffic is bridged to a wired medium, it travels without encryption. However, using WEP definitely reduces the chances that your wireless communications will be easily intercepted and deciphered. See 19, Wireless Networking, for more information about WEP and wireless network configurations. Encrypt all TCP/IP traffic whenever possible The Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) standard provides a uniform process for securely encrypting TCP/IP traffic, including authentication, key negotiation, and packet encryption. Windows XP supports IPSec for both VPN tunneling (via the IPSec/L2TP standard discussed in
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5: Advanced Networking
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20: Maintaining Network Security
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17, Remote Access and Virtual Private Networking ) and for normal TCP/IP communications. IPSec configuration for standard TCP/IP traffic is done by setting a system policy, which allows IPSec to be configured for all computers within a domain or organizational unit as well as on a per-computer basis. To configure IPSec policies on a Windows XP computer, open Local Security Policy from the Administrative Tools folder. Select IP Security Policies On Local Computer in the left pane to view the default IPSec policies that come with Windows XP, as shown in Figure 20-5.
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Figure 20-5.
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IPSec policies are defined in Local Security Policy.
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The simplest way to activate IPSec is to use one of the predefined policies. The first policy, Client (Respond Only), communicates normally with remote TCP/IP hosts using unsecured traffic unless a particular server requests IPSec encryption. At that point, communication with that specific server over the specific requested port will be encrypted; all other traffic will remain unencrypted. The second policy, Secure Server (Require Security), requires all inbound and outbound TCP/IP traffic to be secured using Kerberos authentication (against an Active Directory domain or other authentication system that uses Kerberos). Kerberos is an authentication mechanism originally developed at MIT. All unencrypted traffic, or traffic to or from hosts that cannot be authenticated using Kerberos, will be dropped. The third policy, Server (Request Security), is a compromise between the others. If this policy is in place, Windows XP will always ask remote communication partners to use encryption via Kerberos trust, but will communicate without encryption if it is not available.
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5: Advanced Networking
Part 5: Advanced Networking
Accelerate Your IPSec Traffic Because IPSec traffic is encrypted, it requires significant CPU resources to process each IP packet. If you intend to use IPSec, it is wise to invest in a high-end network adapter that includes an onboard processor that automatically handles IPSec encryption and decryption tasks at the hardware level, leaving the system s CPU free to perform other tasks.
To activate one of these policies, simply right-click it and choose Assign.
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If you want to have finer control over IPSec policies, including selecting specific encryption algorithms, using a different authentication technique (such as a shared key or assigned certificates), or defining specific ports and servers that require IPSec communications, you can develop a custom IPSec policy. For more information on the details of IPSec communication, consult the Windows XP Help and Support Center (choose Start, Help And Support).
note You might find many references, even in the Windows XP Help and Support Center,
that claim that IPSec cannot be used with NAT. This is no longer strictly the case. Most modern residential gateways and NAT devices support IPSec communications, either out of the box or via a firmware upgrade. Some devices, however, will only support traffic with one IPSec-enabled computer behind the NAT gateway at one time.
Avoid applications that use clear text when transmitting sensitive data. If at all possible, avoid using the Telnet protocol to communicate with your Windows XP host or to a UNIX-based server because it passes user names and passwords in clear text. Never e-mail credit card numbers, passwords, or any other sensitive data. If you intend to use your credit card online, make certain that you only submit such sensitive data over an SSL-encrypted HTTP connection to a Web host that has a valid security certificate.
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