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called a token. The token is passed from one computer to another in a round robin fashion. Any computer can transmit if it has possession of the token, and there is no data attached to the token. Once the host decides to transmit, the data is added to the token frame and forwarded to the next host. When the targeted recipient receives the token, it pulls the data off, and then forwards the empty token back into the ring. This method ensures that only one host transmits at a time, and data collisions are not possible.
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To learn more about Ethernet and token passing networks, see 3, Creating Network Connections.
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G Polling media access. This method involves a central authority such as
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a server that polls all the devices on the network and literally asks them if they have anything to transmit. When a host replies with a positive acknowledgment, the polling computer authorizes the transmission. A computer on a polling network cannot transmit unless given permission by the central authority, and the computer must wait for its turn in the polling cycle before it can request such permission.
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2
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1: Windows XP Networking
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Part 1: Windows XP Networking
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Layer 1: The Physical Layer
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The network components that exist at the physical layer have only one function: generating signals along the physical cabling and interfaces on the network. Although there are a variety of methods for generating signals on the network, both analog and digital, the goal is the same: Each method seeks to transmit binary data. The actual devices that exist at the physical layer consist of cables (or wireless connections using radio waves or infrared light), plugs connected to the cabling, and the receiver jacks along with the signaling equipment attached to network adapters (or transmitter/receiver devices for wireless communications).
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2
Understanding TCP/IP in Depth
The majority of networks either support or depend on the TCP/IP protocol suite. Windows networks are certainly no exception, and Windows XP can use TCP/IP for any network from large domains to small home networks. To understand how TCP/IP really works, it is important to understand its inner workings. The TCP/IP protocol suite spans nearly the entire seven layers of the OSI model. The most important layers to understand (with respect to TCP/IP) are layers 3 (network), 4 (transport), and 7 (application).
note TCP/IP was originally designed by the United States Defense Advanced Research
Projects Agency (DARPA), the central R&D organization for the U.S. Department of Defense. It was designed to map directly to the DARPA model of networking protocols rather than the OSI reference model. However, because TCP/IP can be (and most commonly is) described in terms of the OSI model, as are most of the other protocols discussed in this chapter, OSI will be the focus.
Application Layer Protocols
Application layer protocols specify components closest to where the computer user interacts with the computer. Several TCP/IP protocols exist at layer 7, and some of them, such as FTP, HTTP, and SMTP, were discussed earlier in this chapter. There are a few other major protocols in this suite that you should get to know as well, and these are explored in the following sections.
Domain Name System (DNS)
For computers to identify resources on a TCP/IP network, each computer or server on a network must have a unique Internet Protocol (IP) address, such as 192.168.1.55. Because humans have a difficult time remembering strings of numbers like those used in IP addresses, language-based names are used. A language-based name on a TCP/IP network is known as a domain name or fully qualified domain name (FQDN); for
1: Windows XP Networking
2: Configuring TCP/IP and Other Protocols
example, a user s computer located in the Atlanta marketing department of the Tailspin Toys company might be given the FQDN user09.mktg.atlanta.tailspintoys.com. How then can a computer s FQDN be resolved to an IP address (and back again) In the early days of the Internet, only a handful of computers were connected. At that time, all computers depended on a file known as a host file to turn user-friendly names such as mailserver into the IP addresses needed to reach the site. With relatively few computers using networks, this system worked well. However, as the Internet began to grow, it became apparent that a new, more flexible system for tracking address-to-name mappings was needed. Also, because the host file was centrally stored, every computer needed to copy the file from a common source. When the prospect of thousands of network hosts became a reality, it became clear that the system would have to include the distribution of the mapping information as well. The solution to this problem is the Domain Name System (DNS). DNS uses a lightweight (easy to process), hierarchical, distributed, and flexible database that maps FQDNs to their corresponding IP addresses. DNS is a highly expandable naming system that can accommodate the naming needs of any network (it s used to uniquely identify every Web site and resource on the Internet). DNS databases use a client/server model in which any computer trying to match a domain name to an IP address is known as a resolver. These servers house a portion of the DNS IP-to-name mappings and have information about where to forward requests they cannot process. Because DNS is hierarchical, no DNS server has to maintain the records for the entire Internet, and DNS is not crippled by the loss of one server. DNS is dependable and can support private networks (networks using a range of reserved IP addresses that are unavailable to the Internet as a whole) as well as networks publicly accessible via the Internet. DNS is the standard for both Active Directory based Windows networks and for the Internet, and computers in a pure Active Directory environment must use DNS to identify themselves. DNS functions by using unique FQDNs. When an FQDN is requested, the name is resolved into an IP address step by step until the desired server is discovered. Let s say that a server named Server12 resides in the domain named tailspintoys.com. The server s FQDN would be server12.tailspintoys.com. If you need to contact this server from a different domain, perhaps to access a file, the process behind the scenes might follow these steps:
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