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One of the most interesting changes I foresee in the next five years for wireless mobility is the increased reliance on location-based services (LBS), which currently are being considered or deployed at virtually every major healthcare institution in the United States It was estimated at the 2009 Healthcare Information and Management Systems conference that only 2 to 5 percent of all healthcare facilities have deployed LBS The reasons for this are varied but are likely a combination of untried technology on a scaled basis, lack of experience by end users, cost, and poor financial return modeling portrayed by the vendors and integrators Those offering LBS components and services will possibly be mildly incensed at my claim that LBS technology remains somewhat untried There have been many good LBS deployments, but most of them are what we call choke point deployments In other words, the LBS technology can determine whether or not an object or person is in a certain room, but it generally cannot provide high-definition location granularity There are lab queens, very highly tuned LBS deployments that do indeed offer excellent location granularity, even down to a few meters These systems are not ready, however, for deployment by an average network or WLAN engineer, given that they require an uncommon depth of technical knowledge, specific to tags or elements provided by a specific manufacturer This isn t to say that the average WLAN engineer is incapable of obtaining highly granular positioning; the issue is that of error-free velocity how fast it can be completed at the highest levels of performance Providers of LBS components and services must be able to offer to the average WLAN deployment team relative ease of deployment on a repeatable and costeffective basis Currently, LBS can be delivered on a high-definition basis, but not without using some of the best location, networking, application, and RF engineers in the industry There isn t now, nor has there ever been, enough of this talent to scale across even the healthcare industry, much less manufacturing, education, retail, and other key industries that in combination purchase billions of dollars worth of wireless equipment each year It remains to be perhaps the single hardest WLAN service to deploy reliably on an error-free and high-speed basis That all stated, there is rapidly growing pressure on vendors and system integrators to provide LBS Currently, LBS is a good networking practice with a profitable future Few top integrators can provide it at scale, but the number is slowly increasing, and considerable effort by the vendors and integrators, pulled by a large market demand, will eventually move this from the cutting edge to something much more routinely deployed by most reputable systems integrators Next-generation mobility will be driven by use more than by cost or complexity Usage drives value more than virtually any other element If something is used a lot in business, it s seen as valuable Usage, when carefully analyzed, is what drives the evolution of devices, systems, and indeed how a device itself is used The standards protocol itself is constantly evaluated and driven by usage and the belief that usage will be high in the future
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As we consider the element of usage in next-generation wireless networks, it is appropriate to consider the two main groups of individuals exposed to WLANs and the primary uses within those groups The primary personnel exposed to WLANs can be partitioned in a number of different ways, but I suggest that the two primary users are those who deploy the technology and the end users
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If you ever get an opportunity, speak with some of the people who were very close to the design and delivery of the original 80211 equipment for enterprise networks, such as my manager, Mark Tyre, and my colleague Bruce Alexander (both of whom, not incidentally, are the technical editors of this work) You ll soon discover that today s wireless equipment usage is way beyond what was originally imagined by the designers and teams who defined and drove protocols such as 80211 When the protocol originated in the mid-1990s, voice, video, smart buildings, IPv6, and similar issues were breathtakingly complex and far beyond the intent of the IEEE standards body and designers Yet most, if not all, of those elements are now routinely a part of current WLAN systems Today s WLAN complexities were also well beyond what we were doing in the field in terms of our knowledge of how to respond to design requirements We knew some things about the importance of RF design, but not so much with regard to site surveys Site surveys were used for many years to ensure that nothing within the radiating range of the transmitter or receiver would cause interference or other problems The measurement tools at the time were complex and crude You had to be pretty good at using an expensive spectrum analyzer to have a decent chance of eliminating or managing interference problems The output of these devices was not easy to interpret The best of the spectrum analyzers were backpack-sized and required an electrical plug-in In later years, battery-powered analyzers became available, though their power didn t last long before a recharge was required Site surveys were used later to verify design coverage on a multinode design basis, and then the tools quickly became used for WLAN designs This occurred because no tools were generally available for RF coverage RF design tools cost around $100,000, required extensive training, and didn t actually cover all that much for the 80211 and other radio spectrums Tools with far more attractive pricing came much later in the industry s evolution We knew so little about truly effective coverage in the late 1980s and early 1990s Nearly all the early design work was custom crafted by degreed engineers or RF technicians with many years in the industry While careful measurements were made, the bulk of what was completed had a lot more to do with art than science Little design documentation or formal training existed at the onset of today s WLANs More often than not, both ends of the wireless links were stationary Today, it s rare for that to occur; one link end is nearly always in motion Originally, wireless was more of a bridge in many applications, whereas today it s far more generally about enabling motion
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