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Some integrators make final node adjustments to the APs while they have the lift equipment in place This is often the way I ve approached this on major deployments, because elevation equipment tends to move vertically much faster than it does
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Wireless Mobility
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horizontally that is, from one location to another The outcome tends to remain high in quality whether or not the integrator returns to make the final node adjustments or completes them right after hanging the AP The one exception to this occurs when the AP and client densities tend to be very high, as in complex manufacturing environments Most interference comes from native radios that is, radios the customer has already installed Some WLAN controllers will cascade power output and channel settings, and in some cases the timing of radiating environmental changes can coincide in ways with the controllers that tend to chase environments In other words, most controllers operate in reactive mode versus proactive mode with regard to environmental dynamics To be candid and fair to the technology providers of controllers, it would be prohibitively expensive and complex to incorporate technologies and methods that would allow controllers to adjust APs ahead of, or favorably timed with, major radiating environmental changes For that reason, in highly complex radiating environments, I prefer to see how the entire WLAN operates once the entire thing is lit up and almost ready for production To prevent controllers from chasing environmental dynamics in complex radiating environments, I prefer designs in which the RF output and channels are locked down I recognize that some technology vendors will disagree with this approach, but my own experience supports it This is, however, a technological evolution for which we should expect to see continued improvement As the technology continues to improve, we may expect to rely on automated RF power output and channel selection In the few years just ahead, however, trust but verify is an excellent assurance methodology Ultimately, whether the integrator has made the final RF node adjustments during the installation of the APs or shortly thereafter, the more important consideration is that the WLAN have a final and comprehensive checkout prior to turning over the network to the customer One of the best checkout procedures is to use production version applications running over actual wireless clients I use the client with the lowest level of performance and reliability as the baseline unit from which the final tests are completed, using the entire OSI stack This ensures that even the lowest-performing client will operate successfully and reliably in the new WLAN It s important to the end customer, the technology provider, and of course the system integrator to ensure that the WLAN is operating at full specification prior to the integrator leaving the deployment premises It typically costs from 10 to 20 times more to return to a WLAN to troubleshoot and resolve WLAN performance and reliability problems Notably, the customer typically experiences a decrease in confidence in the technology provider and the system integrator in these scenarios Much of my work has involved the restoration of confidence with the integrator and the technology provider Many customers will abandon one or the other after only one deficient deployment experience; it s imperative to ensure the WLAN is performing very well and to demonstrate to the customer that all systems, options, and features are operating reliably When the customer is fully satisfied, you can return to the office for high-fives and advance planning for the next evolution of the WLAN
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Optimal Project Sequencing
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A WLAN is a dynamic asset because the radiating environment is dynamic The natural state of a WLAN is for the performance to deteriorate over time due to changes in complexity in the radiating environment, increasing latency-sensitive applications such as voice and video, increased traffic count, and increased node count All contribute individually to far more strain and load on the network and the wireless access portion of it Mobility is far more than a nice to have network option in today s commercial environments When the network goes down, it is an operational imperative to have it repaired and back online at the earliest moment possible One of the greatest contributions of automated maintenance and remote management is that these assets can monitor deterioration that is as often gradual as it is sudden For this reason, automated maintenance and remote management mechanisms are cost effective because, rather than repair systems remotely or in a fast response mode, they can make adjustments to the network and implement backup systems or technologies More than anything, automated maintenance and remote management repair and maintain WLAN elements before they fail It s important then to integrate these systems as part of the original design in not only larger enterprise-class networks but increasingly in the mid-market sized networks and even small office and home office networks The right combination of automated mechanisms, from controller-based intelligence and client-based audits, enables two valuable assets: resolving problems before they become expensive, and assuring a smoother technology migration to next-generation systems Often, a solid relationship of trust exists between the remote managers and owners of a network system, and that s also true in today s WLAN environments These managers are well placed to advise the end customer in which technologies, policies, vendors, and system integrators will best enable the reduction in not only the operating expense of a network but also the remote maintenance and management of a WLAN and other key network elements such as security, voice, and video, to name a few In critical industries such as healthcare, police and fire departments, and emergency medical services, it s somewhat of a surprise to learn how limited the resources are, not just for planning and deployment of WLANs, but also regarding maintenance Often, the customer IT teams are so fully subscribed simply deploying the next technology that they have precious few cycles remaining to maintain systems before they break or require significant upgrades Optimal project sequencing is a terrific methodology for both larger and smaller WLAN projects Using these steps and this sequence will help bring order, the protection afforded through collaboration, and quite often increased budgets through the combining of common goals and objectives within the same customer This ensures that the maximum financial return and other success metrics are considered, and indeed even mission-critical, in the ever more rapidly evolving realm of wireless networks
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