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TABLE 14 Advantages and Disadvantages of Gas-to-Liquids (GTL) Technology ADVANTAGES: Allows owners of remote gas reserves a way to bring their gas to market Tighter air quality standards will create high demand for low sulfur diesel, like that produced by GTL Diesel fuel is ultra-low sulfur free and has a higher cetane number than diesel from crude oil Allows stranded to be turned into useful/valuable products Products are compatible with existing tankers, pipelines, and storage facilities Engines running on GTL fuels pollute less Greater global use of GTL-made gasoline and diesel could slow down oil demand If gas or products need to be imported, does not reduce dependence on foreign energy Conversion plants are expensive to build Many large gas reserves are found in politically unstable areas Products will have to be transported from distant production centers adds to cost
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DISADVANTAGES:
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products derived from coal upgrading or by extraction or hydrogenation of organic matter in coke liquids, coal tars, tar sands, or bitumen deposits More recently, the potential for natural gas as a source of liquid fuels has been recognized and attention is now on the development of natural gas as a source of liquid fuels Projected shortages of petroleum make it clear that, for the remainder of the twenty-first century, alternative sources of liquid fuels are necessary Such sources (eg, natural gas) are available but the exploitation technologies are in general not as mature as for petroleum The feasibility of the upgrading of natural gas to valuable chemicals, especially liquid fuels, has been known for years However, the high cost of the steam reforming and the partial oxidation processes, used for the conversion of natural gas to syngas has hampered the widespread exploitation of natural gas Other sources include tar sand (also called oil sand or bituminous sand) (Berkowitz and Speight, 1975; Speight, 1990) and coal (Speight, 1994) that are also viable sources of liquid fuels The potential of natural gas, which typically has 85 to 95 percent methane, has been recognized as a plentiful and clean alternative feedstock to crude oil Currently, the rate of discovery of proven natural gas reserves is increasing faster than the rate of natural gas production Many of the large natural gas deposits are located in areas where abundant crude oil resources lie such as in the Middle East However, huge reserves of natural gas are also found in many other regions of the world, providing oil-deficient countries access to a plentiful energy source The gas is frequently located in remote areas far from centers of consumption, and pipeline costs can account for as much as one-third of the total natural gas cost Thus tremendous strategic and economic incentives exist for gas conversion to liquids; especially if this can be accomplished on site or at a point close to the wellhead where shipping costs becomes a minor issue However, despite reduced prominence, coal technology continues to be a viable option for the production of liquid fuels in the future World petroleum production is expected ultimately to level off and then decline and despite apparent surpluses of natural gas, production is expected to suffer a similar decline Coal gasification to syngas is utilized to synthesize liquid fuels in much the same manner as natural gas steam reforming technology But the important aspect is to use the natural gas reserves when they are available and to maximize the use of these reserves by conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels
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CHAPTER ONE
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125 Gas Hydrates Gas hydrates are crystalline solids in which a hydrocarbon, usually methane is trapped in a lattice of ice They occur in the pore spaces of sediments, and may form cements, nodes, or layers Gas hydrates are found in naturally-occurring deposits under ocean sediments or within continental sedimentary rock formations The worldwide amounts of carbon bound in gas hydrates is conservatively estimated to total twice the amount of carbon to be found in all known fossil fuels on Earth Methane trapped in marine sediments as a hydrate represents such an immense carbon reservoir that it must be considered a dominant factor in estimating unconventional energy resources; the role of methane as a greenhouse gas also must be carefully assessed Hydrates store immense amounts of methane, with major implications for energy resources and climate, but the natural controls on hydrates and their impacts on the environment are very poorly understood Gas hydrates occur abundantly in nature, both in Arctic regions and in marine sediments Gas hydrate is a crystalline solid consisting of gas molecules, usually methane, each surrounded by a cage of water molecules It looks very much like ice Methane hydrate is stable in ocean floor sediments at water depths greater than 300 m, and where it occurs, it is known to cement loose sediments in a surface layer several hundred meters thick This estimate is made with minimal information from US Geological Survey (USGS) and other studies Extraction of methane from hydrates could provide an enormous energy and petroleum feedstock resource Additionally, conventional gas resources appear to be trapped beneath methane hydrate layers in ocean sediments The immense volumes of gas and the richness of the deposits may make methane hydrates a strong candidate for development as an energy resource Because the gas is held in a crystal structure, gas molecules are more densely packed than in conventional or other unconventional gas traps Gas-hydrate-cemented strata also act as seals for trapped free gas These traps provide potential resources, but they can also represent hazards to drilling, and therefore must be well understood Production of gas from hydrate-sealed traps may be an easy way to extract hydrate gas because the reduction of pressure caused by production can initiate a breakdown of hydrates and a recharging of the trap with gas Seafloor slopes of 5 and less should be stable on the Atlantic continental margin, yet many landslide scars are present The depth of the top of these scars is near the top of the hydrate zone, and seismic profiles indicate less hydrate in the sediment beneath slide scars Evidence available suggests a link between hydrate instability and occurrence of landslides on the continental margin A likely mechanism for initiation of land sliding involves a breakdown of hydrates at the base of the hydrate layer The effect would be a change from a semi-cemented zone to one that is gas-charged and has little strength, thus facilitating sliding The cause of the breakdown might be a reduction in pressure on the hydrates due to a sea-level drop, such as occurred during glacial periods when ocean water became isolated on land in great ice sheets
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126 Biomass Biomass, in the present context, refers to living and recently dead biologic material which can be used as fuel or for industrial production For example, manure, garden waste, and crop residues are all sources of biomass Biomass is a renewable energy source, unlike other resources such as petroleum, natural gas, tar sand, coal, and oil shale But like coal and petroleum, biomass is a form of stored solar energy
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