NINE in Visual C#

Read Code 128 Code Set B in Visual C# NINE

CHAPTER NINE
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The greatest potential for ethanol production from biomass, however, lies in enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulose The enzyme cellulase, now used in the textile industry to stone wash denim and in detergents, simply replaces the sulfuric acid in the hydrolysis step The cellulase can be used at lower temperatures, 30 to 50 C, which reduces the degradation of the sugar In addition, process improvements now allow simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) In the SSF process, cellulase and fermenting yeast are combined, so that as sugars are produced, the fermentative organisms convert them to ethanol in the same step Once the hydrolysis of the cellulose is achieved, the resulting sugars must be fermented to produce ethanol In addition to glucose, hydrolysis produces other six-carbon sugars from cellulose and five-carbon sugars from hemicellulose that are not readily fermented to ethanol by naturally occurring organisms They can be converted to ethanol by genetically engineered yeasts that are currently available, but the ethanol yields are not sufficient to make the process economically attractive It also remains to be seen whether the yeasts can be made hardy enough for production of ethanol on a commercial scale A large variety of feedstocks is currently available for producing ethanol from cellulosic biomass The materials being considered can be categorized as agricultural waste, forest residue, and energy crops Agricultural waste available for ethanol conversion includes crop residues such as wheat straw, corn stover (leaves, stalks, and cobs), rice straw, and bagasse (sugar cane waste) Forestry waste includes underutilized wood and logging residues; rough, rotten, and salvable dead wood; and excess saplings and small trees Energy crops, developed and grown specifically for fuel, include fast-growing trees, shrubs, and grasses such as hybrid poplars, willows, and switchgrass Although the choice of feedstock for ethanol conversion is largely a cost issue, feedstock selection has also focused on environmental issues Materials normally targeted for disposal include forest thinnings collected as part of an effort to improve forest health, and certain agricultural residues, such as rice straw Although forest residues are not large in volume, they represent an opportunity to decrease the fire hazard associated with the dead wood present in many forests Small quantities of forest thinnings can be collected at relatively low cost, but collection costs rise rapidly as quantities increase Agricultural residues, in particular corn stover, represent a tremendous resource base for biomass ethanol production Agricultural residues, in the long-term, would be the sources of biomass that could support substantial growth of the ethanol industry At conversion yields of around 60 to 100 gal/dry ton, the available corn stover inventory would be sufficient to support 7 to 12 billion gallons of ethanol production per year The cost of agricultural residues is not nearly as sensitive to supply as is the cost of forest residues, although the availability of corn stover could be affected by a poor crop year The relatively low rise in cost as a function of feedstock use is due to the relatively high density of material available that does not involve competition for farmland In addition, the feedstock is located in the corn-processing belt, an area that has an established infrastructure for collecting and transporting agricultural materials It is also located near existing grain ethanol plants, which could be expanded to produce ethanol from stover Initially, locally available labor and residue collection equipment might have to be supplemented with labor and equipment brought in from other locations for residue harvesting and storage operations, if the plants involved are of sufficient scale Eventually, however, when the local collection infrastructure has been built up, costs would come down Dedicated energy crops such as switchgrass, hybrid willow, and hybrid poplar are another long-term feedstock option Switchgrass is grown on a 10-year crop rotation basis, and harvest can begin in the first year in some locations and the second year in others Willows require a 22-year rotation, with the first harvest in the fourth year and subsequent harvests every 3 years thereafter Hybrid poplar requires 6 years to reach harvest age in the Pacific Northwest, 8 years in the Southeast, Southern Plains, and South Central regions,
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Code-128 Reader In Visual Studio .NET
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Decode Code 128 Code Set A In VB.NET
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Decode ANSI/AIM Code 128 In C#.NET
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Decoding Bar Code In Visual C#
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Reading British Royal Mail 4-State Customer Barcode In C#.NET
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Scanning GS1 RSS In VS .NET
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Recognizing PDF417 In .NET
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Decoding Bar Code In .NET
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