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Per treatment
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Gasification
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Fuel gas Gas cleaning 1/4 of the flue- tar, NH3, HCI gas volume
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CaCI2 Condesate water CaF2 CaS Heavy metals
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FIGURE 111 Process Flow for the Gasification of Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)
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CHAPTER ELEVEN
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However, few of the original processes touted as potential methods for waste gasification may not be in current commercial use and reference must be made to gasification processes (for coal) that are in current commercial use (Chap 5) The reason for the coverall lack of commercial processes for waste gasification hinges on several areas For example, most of the processes proposed for waste gasification did not include a separation step Feedstock homogeneity is a prerequisite for many gasifiers and feedstock heterogeneity and process scale-up can lead to intended to mechanical to a number of mechanical problems, shut-downs, sintering, and hot sots leading to corrosion and eventual failure of the reactor wall On the other hand, it is only recently that the fundamental knowledge about waste and gasification has been understood It is not only conversion of the carbon in the waste to gaseous products but the heterogeneity of the noncarbon constituents of the waste and their influence on the process chemistry was difficult to estimate In fact, the gasification process is a complex chemical process that was seriously underestimated, even misunderstood, by many engineers Indeed, several of the processes were merely considered as thermal process without any reference to the details of the chemistry of the conversion In addition, most of these process efforts included use of a fixed bed reactor on the basis of applicability of coal gasification is also applicable to waste The most common equipment was a shaft reactor with a bottom temperature of approximately 1000 C leading to transport problems within the reactor bed and in the shaft to the ash outlet, such as ash sintering The character of coal ash and its effect on gasification is well understood The effect of ash from waste is not yet fully understood and requires extra effort before a suitable reactor can be proposed for waste gasification Finally, most of the systems proposed for waste gasification produced tar or a mixture of tar and gas and very few of the processes included gas cleaning Thus, the tar-rich gas caused problems on the gas side as well as tar condensation in the pipes to the combustor On the other hand, waste that contained metals, glass, and inorganic materials which sinter and melt at higher temperatures also caused reactor problems Overall the heterogeneous composition of domestic and industrial waste has not been beneficial in terms of the gasification of the waste Recycling programs in which the domestic waste is first separated into various components may be a necessary prelude to waste gasification With energy prices (crude oil and natural gas) currently at an all-time high, and threatening to continue at high levels for the foreseeable future, the time is now for development of waste gasification processes
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115 LIQUID FUELS
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Using ethanol as the example, numerous waste streams could be exploited for ethanol production They are often inexpensive to obtain, and in many instances they have a negative value attributable to current disposal costs Some principal waste streams currently under consideration include mixed paper from municipal solid waste, cellulosic fiber fines from recycled paper mills, as well as various biofeedstocks (Chap 8) However, each waste stream has its own unique characteristics, and they generally vary from one source or time to another Therefore, ethanol or, for that matter, the production of liquid fuels from waste streams is not only feedstock dependent but is also process dependent
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FUELS FROM DOMESTIC AND INDUSTRIAL WASTE
1151 Hydrocarbon Fuels Using the term loosely, the standard way of preparing liquid fuels from carbonaceous material is (a) gasify the feedstock to produce synthesis gas and (b) convert the synthesis gas by the Fischer-Tropsch reaction to hydrocarbons (Chap 7) Briefly, synthesis gas (syngas) (Chap 7) is the name given to a gas mixture that contains varying amounts of carbon monoxide and hydrogen generated by the gasification of a carbonaceous fuel to a gaseous product with a heating value Examples include steam reforming of natural gas or liquid hydrocarbons to produce hydrogen, the gasification of coal and in some types of waste-to-energy gasification facilities Synthesis gas consists primarily of carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and hydrogen, and has less than half the energy density of natural gas Synthesis gas is combustible and often used as a fuel source or as an intermediate for the production of other chemicals Synthesis gas for use as a fuel is most often produced by gasification of coal or municipal waste mainly by the following paths: C + O2 CO2 CO2 + C 2CO C + H2O CO + H2 When used as an intermediate in the large-scale industrial synthesis of hydrogen and ammonia, it is also produced from natural gas (via the steam-reforming reaction) as follows: CH4 + H2O CO + 3H2 The Fischer-Tropsch synthesis is, in principle, a carbon-chain-building process, where methylene groups are attached to the carbon chain The actual reactions that occur have been, and remain, a matter of controversy, as it has been the last century since 1930s Even though the overall Fischer-Tropsch process is described by the following chemical equation: (2n + 1)H2 + nCO CnH(2n+2) + nH2O The initial reactants in the above reaction (ie, CO and H2) can be produced by other reactions such as the partial combustion of a hydrocarbon: CnH(2n+2) + 1/2 nO2 (n + 1)H2 + nCO for example (when n = 1), methane (in the case of gas-to-liquids applications): 2CH4 + O2 4H2 + 2CO Or by the gasification of any carbonaceous source, such as biomass and, in the current context, carbonaceous waste: C + H2O H2 + CO The energy needed for this endothermic reaction is usually provided by (exothermic) combustion with air or oxygen: 2C + O2 2CO
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