NATURAL GAS in Visual C#

Reader USS Code 128 in Visual C# NATURAL GAS

NATURAL GAS
Code 128C Reader In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode decoder for VS .NET Control to read, scan Code 128 image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code 128 Code Set B Recognizer In Visual C#
Using Barcode decoder for VS .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
At the boiling point, a substance changes its state from liquid to gas A stricter definition of boiling point is the temperature at which the liquid and vapor (gas) phases of a substance can exist in equilibrium When heat is applied to a liquid, the temperature of the liquid rises until the vapor pressure of the liquid equals the pressure of the surrounding atmosphere (gases) At this point there is no further rise in temperature, and the additional heat energy supplied is absorbed as latent heat of vaporization to transform the liquid into gas This transformation occurs not only at the surface of the liquid (as in the case of evaporation) but also throughout the volume of the liquid, where bubbles of gas are formed The boiling point of a liquid is lowered if the pressure of the surrounding atmosphere (gases) is decreased On the other hand, if the pressure of the surrounding atmosphere (gases) is increased, the boiling point is raised For this reason, it is customary when the boiling point of a substance is given to include the pressure at which it is observed, if that pressure is other than standard, that is, 760 mm Hg or 1 atm (STP, Standard Temperature and Pressure) The boiling points of petroleum fractions are rarely, if ever, distinct temperatures It is, in fact, more correct to refer to the boiling ranges of the various fractions; the same is true of natural gas To determine these ranges, the material in question is tested in various methods of distillation, either at atmospheric pressure or at reduced pressure Thus, the boiling points of the hydrocarbon constituents of natural gas increase with molecular weight and the initial boiling point of natural gas corresponds to the boiling point of the most volatile constituents (ie, methane) (Fig 25)
Recognize Barcode In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode recognizer for VS .NET Control to read, scan barcode image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Recognize Bar Code In Visual C#
Using Barcode decoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan read, scan image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
150 100 Boiling point, C 50 0 50 100 150 200 Carbon number
Recognizing Code 128 Code Set B In C#
Using Barcode scanner for .NET Control to read, scan Code 128 Code Set A image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Scanning Code 128 Code Set B In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for ASP.NET Control to read, scan Code 128 image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
FIGURE 25 Carbon number and boiling points of natural gas hydrocarbons (up to octane, C8H18)
Recognizing USS Code 128 In VS .NET
Using Barcode recognizer for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan ANSI/AIM Code 128 image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Recognizing USS Code 128 In Visual Basic .NET
Using Barcode reader for VS .NET Control to read, scan Code 128 Code Set A image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Purified natural gas is neither corrosive nor toxic, its ignition temperature is high, and it has a narrow flammability range, making it an apparently safe fossil fuel compared to other fuel sources In addition, purified natural gas (ie, methane) having a specific gravity (060) lower than that of air (100) rises if escaping and dissipates from the site of any leak However, methane is highly flammable, burns easily and almost completely Therefore, natural gas can also be hazardous to life and property through an explosion When natural gas is confined, such as within a house or in a coal mine, concentration of the gas can reach explosive mixtures that, if ignited, results in blasts that could destroy buildings The flash point (FP) of petroleum or a petroleum product, including natural gas, is the temperature to which the product must be heated under specified conditions to give off sufficient vapor to form a mixture with air that can be ignited momentarily by a specified flame (ASTM D56, D92, and D93) As with other properties, the flash point is dependent on the composition of the gas and the presence of other hydrocarbon constituents (Fig 26)
Linear Barcode Decoder In C#
Using Barcode scanner for VS .NET Control to read, scan Linear image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Denso QR Bar Code Scanner In Visual C#.NET
Using Barcode reader for .NET Control to read, scan QR-Code image in VS .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
42 50 0 C1 50 FP, C 100 150 200 250 C2 C3
Recognize EAN128 In C#.NET
Using Barcode decoder for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan UCC.EAN - 128 image in Visual Studio .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
2D Barcode Reader In C#
Using Barcode scanner for Visual Studio .NET Control to read, scan Matrix 2D Barcode image in .NET framework applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
CHAPTER TWO
Recognizing EAN - 14 In C#.NET
Using Barcode scanner for .NET framework Control to read, scan EAN / UCC - 14 image in .NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Scan Barcode In Java
Using Barcode recognizer for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Carbon number
Scan Barcode In None
Using Barcode reader for Microsoft Excel Control to read, scan barcode image in Microsoft Excel applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
UPC-A Scanner In Objective-C
Using Barcode recognizer for iPad Control to read, scan UPC Code image in iPad applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
FIGURE 26 Carbon number and flash point of natural gas hydrocarbons (up to octane, C8H18)
Decoding USS Code 128 In Java
Using Barcode decoder for BIRT reports Control to read, scan Code128 image in Eclipse BIRT applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Scan QR In Java
Using Barcode recognizer for Java Control to read, scan read, scan image in Java applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
The fire point is the temperature to which the gas must be heated under the prescribed conditions of the method to burn continuously when the mixture of vapor and air is ignited by a specified flame (ASTM D92) From the viewpoint of safety, information about the flash point is of most significance at or slightly above the maximum temperatures (30 to 60 C, 86 to 140 F)) that may be encountered in storage, transportation, and use of liquid petroleum products, in either closed or open containers In this temperature range the relative fire and explosion hazard can be estimated from the flash point For products with flash point below 40 C (104 F) special precautions are necessary for safe handling Flash points above 60 C (140 F) gradually lose their safety significance until they become indirect measures of some other quality The flash point of a petroleum product is also used to detect contamination A substantially lower flash point than expected for a product is a reliable indicator that a product has become contaminated with a more volatile product, such as gasoline The flash point is also an aid in establishing the identity of a particular petroleum product A further aspect of volatility that receives considerable attention is the vapor pressure of petroleum and its constituent fractions The vapor pressure is the force exerted on the walls of a closed container by the vaporized portion of a liquid Conversely, it is the force that must be exerted on the liquid to prevent it from vaporizing further (ASTM D323) The vapor pressure increases with temperature for any given gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas, or other product The temperature at which the vapor pressure of a liquid, either a pure compound of a mixture of many compounds, equals 1 atmosphere (147 psi, absolute) is designated as the boiling point of the liquid The flammable range is expressed by the lower explosive limit (LEL) and the upper explosive limit (UEL) The LEL is the concentration of natural gas in the air below which the propagation of a flame will not occur on contact with an ignition source The LEL for natural gas is 5 percent by volume in air and, in most cases, the smell of gas would be detected well before combustion conditions are met The UEL is the concentration of natural gas in the air above which the propagation of a flame will not occur on contact with an ignition source The natural gas UEL is 15 percent by volume in air Explosions caused by natural gas leaks occur a few times each year Individual homes, small businesses, and boats are most frequently affected when an internal leak builds up gas inside the structure Frequently, the blast will be enough to significantly damage a building but leave it standing Occasionally, the gas can collect in high enough quantities to cause a deadly explosion, disintegrating one or more buildings in the process
Decoding Barcode In .NET Framework
Using Barcode recognizer for Reporting Service Control to read, scan barcode image in Reporting Service applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Code-39 Recognizer In Visual Studio .NET
Using Barcode reader for ASP.NET Control to read, scan Code 39 Full ASCII image in ASP.NET applications.
www.OnBarcode.com
Copyright © OnBarcode.com . All rights reserved.