NATURAL GAS in C#

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NATURAL GAS
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277 Hydrogenation and Hydrolysis Processes The reduction of carbonyl sulfide, carbon disulfide, sulfur dioxide, and sulfur vapor in Claus tail gas to hydrogen sulfide is necessary when sulfur recovery of more than 999 percent is required Usually the sulfur recovery level is set by the allowable emissions of sulfur from the tail gas incinerator In addition, the reduction of carbonyl sulfide is done on raw synthesis gas when the downstream acid gas removal process is unable to remove carbonyl sulfide to a sufficient extent to meet sulfur emissions regulations from combustion of the cleaned fuel gas These sulfur compounds are reduced to hydrogen sulfide by hydrogenation or by hydrolysis, at a raised temperature, over a catalytic bed In these processes, elemental sulfur and sulfur dioxide are reduced mainly via hydrogenation, while carbonyl sulfide and carbon disulfide are mainly hydrolyzed to hydrogen sulfide Sulfur and sulfur dioxide are virtually completely converted to hydrogen sulfide when an excess of hydrogen is present The SCOT (Shell Claus off-gas treating) process was developed in the early 1970s and consists of a combination of a catalytic hydrogenation/hydrolysis step and an amine scrubbing unit The hydrogenation/hydrolysis of the sulfur compounds in the tail gases from the Claus unit has already been covered above The early SCOT units consisted of a hydrogenation/hydrolysis reactor and a conventional amine unit (Fig 27) The Claus tail gas, after being reduced in the reactor, is cooled in a quench column and scrubbed by a Sulfinol solution The clean tail gas goes to a Claus incinerator and the acid gas rich solution is regenerated in a stripping column The acid gas off the top of the stripper is recycled back to the Claus plant for further conversion of the hydrogen sulfide The absorber is operated at near atmospheric pressure and the amine solvent is not highly loaded with acid gases Because the solution is not highly loaded, unlike high pressure operation, there is no need for an intermediate flash vessel and the loaded solution goes directly to a stripper
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Natural gas is approximately currently one quarter of the energy resources of the world with use projected to increase over the next two decades (Fig 215) However, to understand the use of natural gas, it is necessary to review the history of natural gas over the past 2000 years as well as the use of natural gas in the United States (Table 27)
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100% 90% 80% 70% 60% 50% 40% 30% 20% 10% 0%
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FIGURE 215
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18 22 26 Other renewables Hydro 49 44 40 Nuclear Natural gas Oil 29 26 Coal 24
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Current and projected use of fossil fuel resources and other fuels until 2020
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CHAPTER TWO
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TABLE 27 Abbreviated Timeline for the Use of Natural Gas 1620 French missionaries recorded that Indians in what is now New York state ignited gases in the shallows of Lake Erie and in the streams flowing into the lake It was in this same area (Fredonia, NY) that the natural gas industry in America began Gas lighting system patented in London by Frederick Winsor First gas company founded in London Metering for households, invented in 1815 by Samuel Clegg, and put into general use during the 1840s First US gas company (using manufactured gas) founded in Baltimore The lighting of the first gas lamp on the corner of Market and Lemon streets in Baltimore, MD, on February 7th marks the effective birth of the gas industry in the United States First natural gas from the wellhead used in Fredonia, NY for house lighting World s first gas cooker was devised in England by James Sharp, but it was not until 1851 that such equipment came into use in America The first industrial use of natural gas in the United States is recorded near Centerville, PA, when gas is used to evaporate brine to make salt Fifty or more US cities were burning public utility gas Edwin L Drake dug the first well and hit oil and natural gas near Titusville, PA An iron 2-in diameter gas pipeline was built, running 5 1/2 miles from the well to Titusville proving that natural gas could be brought safely from its underground source to be used for practical purposes Thomas Edison postulated replacing gas lighting by electric lighting Carl Auer von Welsbach in Germany developed a practical gas mantle Gas is used for the first time to power central heating and to provide a large-scale supply of hot water in London Depleted reservoirs are used for the first time to store gas In the United States, The Natural Gas Act of 1938 established federal authority over interstate pipelines, including the authority to set rates Natural gas (coalbed methane) is produced from coal, while it is still underground in the coal seam, at a colliery at Newman Spinney, England LNG is produced for the first time on an industrial scale in LA It will be transported to Britain for the first by the vessel Methane Pioneer
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1803 1812 1815 1816 1817 1821 1826 1840 1850 1859
1880 1885 1904 1915 1938 1951 1959
After the discovery by the Chinese more than 2000 years ago that the energy in natural gas could be harnessed and used as a heat source, the use of natural gas has grown As already noted above, the American natural gas industry got its beginnings in the mid nineteenth century and most in gas industry observers characterize the Drake well (qv, above) as beginning of the natural gas industry in America During most of the nineteenth century, natural gas was used almost exclusively as a source of light Without a pipeline infrastructure, it was difficult to transport the gas very far, or into homes to be used for heating or cooking Most of the natural gas produced in this era was manufactured from coal, as opposed to transport from a well Near the end of the nineteenth century, with the rise of electricity, natural gas lights were converted to electric lights This led producers of natural gas to look for new uses for their product One of the first lengthy pipelines was constructed in 1891 This pipeline was 120 miles long, and carried natural gas from wells in central Indiana to the city of Chicago However, this early pipeline was very rudimentary, and was not very efficient at transporting natural gas Without any way to transport it effectively, natural gas discovered pre World War II was usually just allowed to vent into the atmosphere, or burnt, when found alongside coal and oil, or simply left in the ground when found alone It wasn t until the 1920s that any significant effort was put into building a pipeline infrastructure However, it wasn t until
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