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Items in parentheses are optional Peer represents a remote service provider edge LSR that services one or more VPNs VPN could be a group of customer IDs or a combination of customer and destination, as well as just a single VPN ID CoS represents the service differentiation levels within the service provider backbone This is distinct from the DSCP (or equivalent) used on the customer network
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From Table 4-3, the following options for multiplexing VPNs and CoS emerge as being the most appropriate for different customer and service provider situations:
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If a customer requires a VLL solution or routing on specific private links, the outer tunnels must be provisioned per {Peer VPN} If a service provider requires more levels of CoS differentiation across the core than can be provided in a single LSP tunnel, the outer tunnels should be provisioned per {Peer CoS} with the inner tunnels per VPN Otherwise, the outer tunnels should be provisioned per peer with inner tunnels per VPN and, optionally, per CoS
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Table 4-3 VPN and CoS Multiplexing
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Outer Tunnel Peer Inner Tunnel VPN ( CoS) Comments Minimizes number of tunnels across the core CoS can be combined with VPN, or a three-level stack with VPN and CoS in either order Best solution for provisioning private VPN-specific tunnels Good solution if more CoS levels needed across core Maximum number of tunnels across the core Max CoS in Corea 8
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VPN Routing Merged
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Peer VPN
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(CoS)
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Separate
Peer CpS
Merged
Peer VPN CoS
None
Separate
a Assumes outer tunnel is provisioned using diffserv extensions to MPLS and the shim header If ATM is used instead of the shim header, replace all instances or 8 in this column with 1
In all these cases, further levels of the inner tunnel could also be used to distinguish VPN-specific destinations on the remote LSR For example, the remote LSR may provide access to more than one segment of the customer network These segments could be treated as separate VPN IDs, thus incorporating the destination into the levels of the label stack covered in Table 4-3, or as a single VPN with a further level of label distinguishing the destination segment
436 Distributing Labels for Nested LSPs
MPLS-based VPN implementations require the use of label stacks for multiplexing of VPNs and/or CoS onto a single LSP tunnel in order to reduce the number of LSP tunnels that transit the network core There are a number of different protocols and techniques that could be used to distribute or signal the labels for these stacks Labels for outer tunnels can be explicitly set up using one of the trafficengineering protocols such as RSVP-TE or CR-LDP This enables bandwidth to be reserved for the outer tunnel Alternatively, CoS-based services may be supplied to customers who do not require explicit bandwidth reservation using a simple egress-targeted label for the destination service provider edge router However, the use of egress-targeted labels implies that the VPN traffic follows the same path through the service provider network
Features of MPLS
as any public IP traffic that is forwarded using these labels and shares the same CoS-based resources The suitability of a label distribution method for distributing the inner labels in VPN label stacks is determined by the following characteristics:
The use of nonunique VPN IDs must be transparent to the network core; otherwise, it will be impossible to distinguish routes for different VPNs The use of private IP addresses within VPNs must also be transparent to the network core since the address spaces may overlap Unsolicited allocation of labels (downstream unsolicited) to all VPN peers (for use on inner LSPs) avoids the need for an explicit signaling exchange (downstream solicited) for each inner label used between every pair of VPN peer sites
Table 4-4 compares several possible approaches to distributing the label stacks between peer LSRs, showing the characteristics and suitability of each protocol for signaling outer or inner tunnels The following conclusions can be drawn from this table:
Egress-targeted outer labels for remote service provider edge routers can be distributed using LDP, provided that bandwidth reservations are not required for these labels Alternatively, outer LSP tunnels should be signaled using RSVP or CRLDP TE protocols if bandwidth reservation is required Piggybacking the distribution of inner labels on one of the routing protocols used by the service provider is likely to be the best method for distributing VPN label stacks in most situations A directory could also be used to store inner labels, but would not be suitable for use with mobile VPN connectivity to multiple service provider edge LSRs
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