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Reading Data Matrix 2d barcode in Java Making Comparisons Comparison and Logical Operators

CHAPTER 6 Making Comparisons Comparison and Logical Operators
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Characters 0 through 9 A through Z a through z
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Values 48 57 65 90 97 122
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Comments 0 is 48; 9 is 57 A is 65; Z is 90 a is 97; z is 122
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Table 6-1
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ASCII Values of Commonly Used Characters
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Option Compare
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As discussed previously, the ASCII values of lowercase alphabetical characters are greater than their uppercase counterparts in other words, a is greater than A The default in Visual Basic is that string comparisons are case sensitive that is, they distinguish whether a character is uppercase or lowercase Consequently, the string jeff is greater than, rather than equal to, Jeff Depending on the context of your program, you may want to make case-insensitive comparisons; that is, comparisons in which whether a character is uppercase or lowercase is irrelevant In validating a user who is attempting to log on, for example, user names often are not case sensitive, whereas passwords often are You use the Option Compare statement to declare the default comparison method to use when string data is compared The Option Compare statement may be one, but only one, of the following: Option Compare Binary Option Compare Text Option Compare Binary is the default and is a case-sensitive comparison Option Compare Text is a case-insensitive comparison Thus, under Option Compare Binary, aaa is greater than AAA However, under Option Compare Text, aaa is equal to AAA You can change the default Option Compare setting by using the Options dialog box shown in Figure 6-2 This dialog, which is displayed via the Tools | Options menu command, also was discussed in 5 in connection with the Option Strict statement You can change the Option Compare setting in one of two ways One way is to choose Text from the drop-down box in the Options dialog box The alternative is to declare an Option Compare Text statement above the beginning of the class declaration:
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Option Compare Text Public Class Form1
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Visual Basic 2005 Demysti ed
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Figure 6-2
The Options dialog box
Like Operator
The Like operator is different from the preceding comparison operators in that it is used with strings rather than numbers, returning True if a string matches a specified pattern, False if it does not Here is the syntax for the Like operator:
[string] Like [pattern]
Pattern matching often is used in everyday computing activities For example, in searching for a file on your computer that you know starts with msado and has the extension dll, you could do a search for the file msado*dll, using the wildcard character * Table 6-2 lists some of the pattern-matching characters
Characters in Pattern * # Matches in String Any single character Zero or more characters Any single digit (0 9)
Table 6-2
Pattern-Matching Characters
CHAPTER 6 Making Comparisons Comparison and Logical Operators
The wildcard character * is commonly used for searches, particularly when not all of the details of the string being searched for are known or remembered The following comparison is True because aBBBa has an a at the beginning, an a at the end, and any number of characters in between:
"aBBBa" Like "a*a"
The wildcard character provides for a more focused and therefore faster search than * because, whereas the * wildcard character can represent zero or more characters, the wildcard character represents one character, no more and no less The following comparison is True because BAT starts with a B, ends with a T, and has exactly one character in between:
"BAT" Like "B T"
The wildcard characters and *, like others, can be combined The following comparison is True because BAT starts with a B, followed by any single character, followed by a T, and finally zero or more characters of any type:
"BAT123khg" Like "B T*"
The wildcard character # provides for an even more focused search than the wildcard character because, whereas the wildcard character can represent any one character, the # wildcard character only can represent a character that is a digit The following comparison is True because a2a begins and ends with an a and has exactly a single digit number in between:
"a2a" Like "a#a"
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