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Misc PC Board, battery holder, battery clip, The 6N2 receiver is a dual conversion, dual band amateur radio receiver; it combines the excitement of two very active amateur radio bands in one small receiver, see Figure 12-1 The 6N2 receiver will allow radio enthusiasts, both the young and old, to get a
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Figure 12-1 6N2 meter amateur radio receiver
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C h a p t e r T w e l v e : 6 & 2-Meter Dual-Band Amateur Radio
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Convert to 455 kHz and amplify Block 3
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Block 1 Speaker
Figure 12-2
2 meter amateur radio receiver block diagram
modulated signal is recovered from the 455 kHz I-F signal in (Block 2) The audio signal is amplified to drive a speaker in (Block 1), see Figure 12-2 The 6N2 receiver specifications are illustrated in Table 12-1 So you ask, why dual conversion To answer this question, take a look at the diagram shown in Figure 12-3, and it may become more clear In order to obtain the desired intermediate frequency (I-F) signal by mixing the local oscillator with the desired radio frequency, an unwanted output may result due to a transmission spaced one intermediate frequency or (I-F) on the opposite side of the oscillator (image) By using a large I-F frequency, this image is moved further out of the band of desired frequencies The second conversion
provides the selectivity to filter out the desired narrow band transmission The 6N2 receiver operates on two of the most popular VHF amateur radio bands The 6N2 VHF amateur radio receiver receives both the 6-meter ham band and the 2-meter ham bands, and you can select the band with a band-switch To help you visualize the relationship between frequency and wavelength, take a look at the diagram shown in Figure 12-4 If the speed of a wave (meters per second) is divided by the number of waves that pass a given point (cycles per second), the seconds cancel and you obtain the wavelength = meters per cycle The speed of radio waves is approximately 300,000,000 meters per second If the frequency is 50 to 54 MHz, the wavelength becomes 300,000,000/50,000,000 or 6 meters So for the 2-meter band, which is approximately 150 MHz, the wavelength becomes 300,000,000/150,000,000 or 2 meters The actual bands are: 2-meter band which covers 144 MHz to 148 MHz, and the 6-meter band which covers 50 MHz to 54 MHz The 6N2 dual band VHF receiver is composed of four major blocks, ie blocks 1 through 4 It is a bit easier to follow how the receiver works if we break it down into smaller defined blocks, see Figure 12-5 The heart of the receiver is the integrated circuit at U1, an almost complete FM receiver on-a-chip The FM receiver chip only requires timing components, a crystal and RF tuning components, a filter The output of the FM radio chip is sent to the audio amplifier chip at U2 Power for the receiver is regulated via the regulator chip at U3
Table 12-1
The 6N2 amateur radio specifications
2-meter band covers 144 MHz to 148 MHz 6-meter band covers 50 MHz to 54 MHz
Single supply voltage (4-12 v) Idle current - 4 milliamps Inputs referenced to ground Input resistance - 50 k Self-centering output voltage Total harmonic distortion less than 02% Output power with 9 volt supply voltage Voltage gain with 10 F from pin 1 to 8 - 200 or 46 dB Voltage gain with pins 1 and 8 open - 20 or 26 dB Bandwidth with pins 1 and 8 open - 300 kHz
Desired band of frequencies Local oscillator Desired frequency Image frequency
C h a p t e r T w e l v e : 6 & 2-Meter Dual-Band Amateur Radio
Single conversion with 455 kHz IF frequency
Second conversion to 455 kHz Crystal oscillator at 10245 MHz Desired frequency 107 MHz 107 MHz Double conversion puts the image outside the desired band and still allows narrow band output Desired band of frequencies Local oscillator Image frequency
Figure 12-3 Single vs double conversion receiver
The receiver is relatively straightforward and can therefore be constructed in stages, one through four We will begin with Stage 1, which can be built and tested separately You can progress step by step and build and test each stage before moving on to the next stage Let s begin with Block 1, the audio amplifier stage
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