how to generate barcode in c# web application The ServiceReferences.ClientConfig file in VB.NET

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Listing 14.4 The ServiceReferences.ClientConfig file
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<configuration> <system.serviceModel> <bindings>
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Connecting to data sources
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<customBinding> Binary <binding name="CustomBinding_HelloWorldService"> encoding <binaryMessageEncoding /> <httpTransport maxReceivedMessageSize="2147483647" maxBufferSize="2147483647"> Buffer/message </httpTransport> size limits </binding> </customBinding> </bindings> Endpoint <client> definition <endpoint address="http://localhost:23867/Services/HelloWorldService.svc" binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="CustomBinding_HelloWorldService" contract="Services.HelloWorldService" name="CustomBinding_HelloWorldService" /> </client> </system.serviceModel> </configuration>
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Although certainly not a requirement, this example uses the new WCF binary encoding with a WCF SOAP service on the server-a new feature enabled by default in Silverlight when using the Silverlight Enabled WCF Service template mentioned in section 14.5.1. This reduces the message size considerably in situations where the server and client aren t using GZIP compression on the content and the server is running .NET 3.5 SP1 or above. In addition, the server side is able to handle more requests due to the binary nature of the messages. The downside is that the service clients are restricted to those aware of the proprietary format, unless you add a second endpoint.
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What about NetTcp
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Another protocol option, which like binary SOAP is specific to WCF, is the NetTcp protocol. Silverlight 4 added support for that protocol using the net.tcp:// scheme. This is a lighter-weight protocol that eliminates the overhead of HTTP in the transaction. Although I won t go into detail here, because it s not commonly used and requires no real changes to your code, I do want to mention that even when using NetTcp, you need to have a policy file on a regular port 80 HTTP server at the same IP address as your NetTcp service. The protocol to include in the Client Access Policy is tcp:
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<grant-to> <socket-resource port="4502-4534" protocol="tcp" /> </grant-to>
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If you leave the policy file out or don t have the server mapped correctly, you ll receive a rather long-winded CommunicationException that tells you the socket connection was forbidden. To test, open your browser and browse to
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http://<IpAddressOfYourNetTcpService>:80/clientaccesspolicy.xml
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Networking and communications
(continued)
and verify that the file downloads. If it does, you re good. If not, then you need to check your IP address and domain names. Other than that, you use NetTcp just as you would SOAP or SOAP with binary encoding. From a proxy usage standpoint, there are no important differences.
When using the information from the .ClientConfig file and eliminating all the setup code, your client-side code becomes considerably simpler, as shown in listing 14.5.
Listing 14.5 Client-side code using ServiceReferences.ClientConfig file XAML:
<StackPanel Margin="30" Width="100"> <TextBlock x:Name="Results" /> <Button x:Name="CallService" Click="CallService_Click" Content="Call Service" /> </StackPanel>
private void CallService_Click( object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { var client = new HelloWorldServiceClient(); client.HelloWorldCompleted += new EventHandler<HelloWorldCompletedEventArgs> (client_HelloWorldCompleted); client.HelloWorldAsync(); } void client_HelloWorldCompleted( object sender, HelloWorldCompletedEventArgs e) { Results.Text = e.Result; }
Proxy Event handler wire-up
Event handler
The code has been simplified considerably because you externalize the settings. This time around, you don t need to create bindings or endpoints and pass them in to the proxy. Whether this is appropriate for your situations comes down to whether you want to handle the bindings in code or in configuration files. In code, you can get the address of the current server and base your service call on that, if appropriate. But if you want to change that algorithm and, say, move from www.mydomain.com/services to api.mydomain.com, you ll need to change code and recompile/redeploy the client. In configuration, you can set the URL to be anything you wish, but you must remember to change it when moving between servers (such as from development to test to staging to production). Given that this doesn t require a recompile and the format is XML inside a standard zip, there s little risk to this approach.
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Connecting to data sources
Simplifying async method calls
If you want an even tighter format for your service-call processing, regardless of whether you re using SOAP, REST, or something else, you can use a lambda expression to build a delegate to handle the service call return. In that case, you get the entire service call neatly wrapped up into one visible function:
private void CallService_Click( object sender, RoutedEventArgs e) { var client = new HelloWorldServiceClient(); client.HelloWorldCompleted += (s, ea) => { Results.Text = ea.Result; }; client.HelloWorldAsync(); }
In this example, the separate event handler is replaced with one defined inline. The handler takes s for the sender and ea for the event arguments. This doesn t turn the call into a synchronous call-it s still async. You simply compact the event wire-up step. When used inside a function like this, there is no downside to this approach, so I use it constantly due to its compactness and readability. Don t use this approach for class-level handlers, because you may end up with multiple handlers without any way to remove them.
That s all it takes to use SOAP services in Silverlight. Silverlight isn t limited to SOAP services. Next, we ll discuss consuming REST services through Silverlight, a topic that opens up a whole new arena of data providers.
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