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Observations of Mercury have been made by radar Surface details of Mercury are difficult to resolve with optical telescopes based on the Earth s surface because that planet is always near the Sun in the sky The rotation rate of Mercury was once believed to be 88 Earth days, identical with its period of revolution around the Sun The radar telescope revealed that one rotation is completed in 59 Earth days Mercury has a day of its own, but it is long and strange by our standards Echoes from the planet Mercury have been used to verify one of the predictions of Albert Einstein s general theory of relativity According to
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Einstein s equations, radio waves passing close to a massive object, such as the Sun, should appear to slow down because of the curvature of space in the gravitational field All radiant energy, according to general relativity, is affected in this way near massive celestial objects Experimenters bounced radar signals off Mercury as it passed on the far side of the Sun (Fig 18-5) According to general relativity, an illusion should occur in which Mercury seems to deviate about 65 km outside its orbital path as it passes behind the Sun This deviation was found, and it takes place to the exact extent predicted by Einstein The echoes are slightly delayed as the signals pass near the Sun on their way to and from Mercury
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Figure 18-5 Mercury appears to deviate outside its orbit when it passes behind the Sun (The extent of the deviation is exaggerated in this drawing)
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Radar astronomy is useful in the study of meteors Meteors apparently come, for the most part, from inside the Solar System; they are not interstellar wanderers This can be deduced by determining the velocities of large numbers of meteors relative to Earth The velocities of meteors as they enter the atmosphere can be measured accurately using radar Such measurements are difficult or impossible to do by visual means From the radar information, an astronomer can figure out the original paths of meteors through space These paths always turn out to be orbits around the Sun
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Meteors arrive during the day as well as at night, and the radar telescope can see them in visual daylight as well as in visual darkness This gives the radar-equipped observer another advantage over the visual observer
SOLAR OBSERVATION
The Sun has been observed by radar Even though the surface is not solid, the outward motion of subatomic particles has been detected: the solar wind The surface of the Sun is different in the radio part of the EM spectrum as compared with the visible-light portion The Sun has, of course, no solid surface as does the Earth, Venus, or Mercury The apparent diameter of the solar globe depends on the EM wavelength at which the Sun is observed This makes it possible to examine the motion of the gases at different levels Great turbulence exists there; we know this because Doppler shifts are constantly observed Radar telescopes allow astronomers to calculate how fast the gases rise and fall as the Sun s surface boils in an endless storm
EFFECTIVE RANGE
The maximum range of a radar telescope is limited by two factors First, there is path loss, caused by the sheer physical distances over which radar signals must travel on their way from the antenna to the target and back Second, the free-space speed of EM-wave propagation is finite Although 299,792 km/s (186,282 mi/s) seems fast on a terrestrial scale, it is sluggish with respect to the Cosmos Path loss increases with distance and mandates more sensitive receivers and more powerful transmitters as the distance gets greater There is a practical limit to how sensitive any rf receiver can be made There is also a limit to how much power can be generated in a radar transmitter and a limit to how much gain can be realized with an antenna of manageable size There is yet room for engineers to design and build larger antennas, more sensitive receivers, and more powerful transmitters Eventually, however, economic considerations must prevail over scientific curiosity The propagation-speed constraint is insurmountable no matter what the size of the hardware budget An echo from Pluto returns to Earth approximately 10 hours after the signal is sent An echo from the nearest star system would not return for almost 9 years Most of the star systems in our galaxy are so far away that the echoes from a radar set will not come back
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