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The simplest, and generally the cheapest, set of bearings you can get for a telescope is the azimuth-elevation (az-el) mount It goes by other names too, such as altitude-azimuth, altazimuth, or alt-az Figure 20-10 is a simplified drawing of a refractor employing this system The azimuth bearing turns 360 degrees in the horizontal plane The elevation bearing rotates in the vertical plane for as far as the telescope will allow Theoretically, only 90 degrees of elevation range is necessary, from the horizon to the zenith Using the bearings in combination, the telescope can be pointed to any object in the sky Because of the construction of the particular az-el system shown in Fig 20-10, it is sometimes called a fork mount
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Figure 20-10 The az-el mount makes it easy to aim a
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telescope at any point in the sky
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The az-el mount, while convenient for casual telescope users, has limitations As Earth rotates, objects move across the sky in paths parallel to the celestial equator Near the celestial equator, this motion is from east to
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west; near the celestial poles it is in circles, counterclockwise in the northern hemisphere and clockwise in the southern In order to follow an object across the sky over a period of time, you ll have to adjust both the azimuth and the elevation settings in an az-el mount (unless you happen to be at either the north or the south geographic pole) It would be much easier if you only had to move one of the bearings This is possible with a simple modification of the az-el system
FORK MOUNT/WEDGE
If an az-el mount is tilted so that the plane of the horizon corresponds with the celestial equator rather than with the actual horizon, a telescope can track objects in the sky by continuous adjustment of only one bearing The 360 degree azimuth bearing from the az-el system becomes a right-ascension (RA) bearing When it is rotated, the telescope moves east and west in celestial longitude The range of the elevation bearing from the az-el system must be extended to cover 180 degrees, and it becomes a declination bearing When it is adjusted, the telescope moves north and south in celestial latitude The proper tilt for the converted az-el system is accomplished by means of a wedge, constructed or set at an angle that corresponds to the terrestrial latitude where the telescope is located The fork mount, which gets its name from its shape, lends itself readily to this scheme (Fig 20-11) This system is popular among SCT users The fork mount/wedge requires alignment to work properly The RA axis (the axis of the right-ascension bearing) must point precisely at the north celestial pole A slight misalignment will result in improper tracking, especially over long periods of time To ensure that the alignment is correct, the wedge is adjustable You should determine your latitude down to the minute of arc (There are several Web sites that can provide you with this information if you live in a town of at least medium size Because the Web page locations change constantly, the best way to find them is to enter the phrase latitude and longitude into a well-known search engine such as googlecom)
DOBSONIAN MOUNT
Large Newtonian telescopes those over 25 cm (10 in) in diameter present a special challenge when it comes to mounting them and viewing through them The Dobsonian mount, named after its inventor, is an az-el system that sits directly on the ground or pavement (Fig 20-12)
To north celestial pole
Your Home Observatory
Declination bearing
Wedge and Right ascension bearing
Fixed base
Figure 20-11 A wedge can be added to a fork mount for
easy tracking of celestial objects
Dobsonian mounts usually are constructed from plywood with Teflon bearings The plywood helps to dampen vibrations transmitted through the ground, such as can be caused by heavy trucks on nearby streets The Teflon bearings provide ease and smoothness of movement Because the telescope sits lower to the surface than is the case with a tripod or pedestal mount, the eyepiece can be reached with less difficulty However, with extremely large Newtonian reflectors (those over 40 cm across and/or with high f-ratios), a ladder is necessary for viewing objects near the zenith The limitations of the Dobsonian mount are similar to those of the az-el mount Tracking can be inconvenient because both the azimuth and the elevation bearings must be moved Special equatorial mounting tables are available for Dobsonian telescopes The table is sloped, and the slope can be adjusted; it performs the same function as the wedge in the fork mount/wedge system If you happen to live in the tropics, the slope of the
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