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When they are not plugged into a wall outlet, portable computers get their power from special batteries Most portable batteries are either nickel and metal hydride (NiMH) or lithium ion (LiIon) LiIon batteries use newer technology than NiMH and are smaller and lighter and produce more power LiIon batteries are, however, more expensive Portable system batteries must be recharged from time to time, and this is the job of the AC adapter, which plugs into a regular electrical outlet The adapter recharges the battery while the portable is operating However, if you are not near a wall outlet when the battery s power fades, you need to replace the battery with a fully charged one Due to the necessity for changing the battery frequently, most portables allow easy access to it In many cases, the battery fits into a compartment on the bottom or in the side of the computer If this is the case, remove the battery compartment s cover, slide the old battery out, and slide the new one in (see Figure 2-13) If the
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FIGURE 2-13
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A battery located on the underside of a portable system
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battery s compartment is on the bottom, there might be a release mechanism that allows you to remove the battery Remove the old one and insert the new one Many newer systems allow for multiple batteries to be contained in the system While this adds battery usage time, it also increases the weight of the system Fortunately, most portable systems give you plenty of notice before the battery is completely drained Many systems include a power-level meter that allows you to see the battery s charge level at all times Other systems give you a visual warning when the battery s power dips below a certain level
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Additional RAM can be added to a portable system in a number of ways Some systems include extra RAM slots within the chassis This type requires you to open the computer s case and place the RAM module in an available slot (see Figure 2-14) Because RAM modules for portables are proprietary, you cannot use them in desktop computers or in other portables An easier way to add more RAM to your portable is to use a memory PC Card PC Cards were described earlier as being small cards that can be easily inserted in a portable to enhance or expand its abilities In fact, PC Cards originated as PCMCIA cards specifically for the purpose of adding more memory PCMCIA stands for Personal Computer Memory Card International Association, a bit of a misnomer because these cards are usually used in laptops, not in PCs (desktops)
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FIGURE 2-14
Installing a RAM module in a portable system
To use a memory PC Card, simply insert it into the appropriate PC slot on the portable, usually located on the side (see Figure 2-15) Because memory cards are used so often, they tend to be more standardized than other portable system components This means that you can use a generic memory PC Card in your portable system
Types I, II, and III Cards
Type I PC Cards are roughly the size of a credit card (856mm x 54mm x 33mm) Due to the popularity of these cards, the PCMCIA went on to develop another standard: PCMCIA 2 This standard includes the use of Type II cards These cards have the same physical dimensions as Type I cards except that they are 5mm thick instead of 33mm Type II PCMCIA cards are typically used for I/O devices, including network cards, modems, and sound cards In 1994, the PCMCIA released yet another standard, PCMCIA 201 This standard includes the Type III card, and the name was officially changed from PCMCIA card (a real mouthful) to the shortened PC Card Type III cards have the same length and width measurements as Type I and Type II cards but are 105mm thick They are usually used for hard drive storage The 201 standard also supports a wider data bus (the 32-bit Cardbus) All PC Card standards support hot swapping A service called socket services runs inside the portable and detects when a PC Card has been inserted or removed When a card is inserted, another service, called card services, assigns the card the
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