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This analysis for RLS can be based on the conditions from our security profile As we discussed in the section related to identifying DBV factors, our example security profile presents RLS examples based on the security profile conditions around the concept of Weekly Maintenance Window and Product Ownership/Responsibility If we dig a little deeper into the conditions and the compliance-driven requirements these conditions impose, we see that controls are required on the visibility of end user Social Security numbers and salary information to the application Oracle VPD s fine-grained access control for security-relevant column masking meets these compliancebased requirements NOTE Refer to David Knox s Effective Oracle Database 10g Security By Design (McGraw-Hill, 2009) for a comparison between Oracle VPD and Oracle OLS Oracle OLS is a more intuitive and declarative model to work with initially, while Oracle VPD has the flexibility to create and support more complex PL/SQL function policies that implement row-level security
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Identify Accounts, Roles, and DBV Realm Authorizations from Use Case Actors
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If we look at our security profile syntax, we ve defined what must be protected (the object), the commands or privileges we need to control (the verb), and how they need be protected (the conditions, based on compliance, application, and business rules), but we haven t spent time describing who (the subject) To define the subject-level aspects of our security profile, we need to consider the entire set of use cases that make up our system and not just the Sales Management related use case If we consider the overall notional software architecture, we find actors such as sales data administrators, database administrators, batch program accounts, internal web service consumers, external (partner) web service consumers, and more subtlety accounts that will own objects and code In 1, we introduced the concept of schema profiles that include object owner accounts user access accounts The user access accounts included user profiles with read-only users, read-write users, application administrators/developers, and database administrators We need to examine the actors in our use cases and classify them according to the profiles presented in 1 Next, we ll create database roles and accounts for these actor classifications so we can associate a real database identity to each actor Once this is done, we can authorize the appropriate role or account in the DBV realms we have identified To help clarify the process, we will first look at the details of each profile s relationship to DBV roles and concepts We then present a detailed implementation example that demonstrates how the profiles might be constructed in DBV-enabled database
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We first want to examine the actors in our notional software architecture to determine how they can be categorized using the profiles presented in the first chapter and understand how DBV may shape the form of those profiles in implementation As we examine the profiles in more detail, you will discover that DBV helps enable the development of either a coarse-grained and fine-grained separation of duty model for some of the object owner and user access profiles A fine-grained separation of duty model might be warranted in a system that contains highly
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sensitive information or when compliance regulations are enforced Let s examine each profile in more detail to help clarify the approach to constructing these profiles as roles and accounts
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In this section, we introduce two types of object-owner accounts: commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) accounts that may be required by a software product and database application and system accounts that may used in batch (database) processing jobs We will examine how these two types of object-owner accounts have common privilege models and how you can protect these accounts from being used in a manner in which they were not intended to be used
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Group COTS or Application Account As discussed in 1, group accounts are installed with vendor commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products that are rarely accessed by privileged database administrators to perform software maintenance: MDSYS for a spatial or SH account is an example in our use case As discussed in 1, the SYS account falls into the category of a group account that is shared by many database administrators through access to an OS account s credentials Typically, the non-SYS account would be locked with the password expired and controlled by the account administrator as described next The application account is typically granted a limited set of system privileges that enable the creation and maintenance of tables, views, and PL/SQL objects in its own schema Note that DBV includes the role DV_REALM_ RESOURCE that can be leveraged to create application accounts The role includes all the system privileges you d find in the normal RESOURCE role with the addition of the CREATE VIEW and CREATE SYNONYM privileges This role includes the following system privileges:
CREATE CLUSTER CREATE INDEXTYPE CREATE OPERATOR CREATE PROCEDURE CREATE SEQUENCE CREATE SYNONYM CREATE TABLE CREATE TRIGGER CREATE TYPE CREATE VIEW CREATE SESSION
System Accounts Oracle products and your own applications will leverage accounts that would never really be accessed by a database administrator if you are using the named user account pattern to maintain audit attribution to real end users For example, Oracle Enterprise Manager (EM) uses the SYSMAN and DBSNMP accounts for statistics collection and runs this collection processing through a database job Your own applications may have similar accounts that run on a scheduled basis as part of batch processing This processing might leverage Oracle Secure External Passwords to interact with the database to load or extract database records These accounts may own data tables, views, PL/SQL programs, and other objects that would be accessed
Part II:
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