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Bob Beauchemin is a database-centric application practitioner and architect, instructor, course author, writer, and Developer Skills Partner for SQLskills. Over the past few years he s been writing and teaching his SQL Server 2005 and 2008 courses to students worldwide through Microsoft-sponsored programs, as well as private client-centric classes. He is the lead author of the books A Developer s Guide to SQL Server 2005 and A First Look at SQL Server 2005 For Developers, author of Essential ADO.NET, and writes a database development column for MSDN magazine.
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A major goal of the new Transact-SQL (T-SQL) features in SQL Server 2008 is to reduce the amount of code you need to write for common scenarios. Many new language features simplify code, and table-valued parameters probably do so most dramatically. Such an innocuous name for a radical new feature! It s the sort of thing that only a geek could love: the ability to pass a table to a procedure. It s a simple enhancement but will change the way you think about programming SQL Server forever. If you ve ever passed a comma or other delimited list of data values to a stored procedure, then split them up, and processed them, or bumped up against stored procedure parameter limits, you know the pain that is now forever gone. In this chapter I ll explore the syntax and use of this new T-SQL feature, both in SQL Server code as well as client code. By the end of the chapter, you ll wonder how you ever programmed without it!
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Before SQL Server 2008, there was no easy way to pass data containers arrays, DataSets, DataTables, and so on to stored procedures and functions. You could pass single scalar values with no problem, although if you had to pass many parameters you might run into the limit on parameters, which is 2,100. Objects like arrays, in-memory tables, and other constructs are not the kind of set-based objects that T-SQL deals with. Yet sometimes it is necessary to pass data containers to a code module. Over the years, the ever-resourceful SQL Server community has devised plenty of ways to get around this problem. Some of the more common workarounds have included the following: Pass in a delimited string, and parse it using T-SQL s less-than-robust stringhandling features. Pass data to the procedure as XML and shred it into a relational form.
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Create long parameter lists with plenty of optional parameters to accommodate varying needs. Create a global temporary table or even a permanent Parameters table to store lists of parameter data, which is often linked to a particular user connection. The problem has plenty of other creative solutions. Unfortunately, making these solutions work requires either convoluted code or a shared resource or both, thereby creating maintenance nightmares. Another kind of problem with T-SQL s inability to pass a data container as a parameter occurs when you pass data from a client application to be stored or processed in SQL Server. The canonical problem of this type is creating a new customer order along with one or more order line items. The overall workflow between client application and database server goes something like this: Pass the order header information, including customer ID, order date, and other order details. Get the new order ID back (normally the primary key of the Order table), then make multiple calls to an InsertOrderDetail stored procedure to insert each order detail line item s data. Because there has been no easy way to encapsulate all this in a single call to the database server, the application has a chatty relationship with the server, causing many round trips and creating a fragile situation. You had to be careful with transactions, because whenever so much data was flowing back and forth between the application server and the database server, too many things could go wrong. In addition, it s never a good idea to leave data fragments lying around a database.
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Table-valued parameters to the rescue!
Microsoft has felt our pain, and their solution is table-valued parameters (TVPs). This is not a new data type, but rather an object variable of type TABLE, an in-memory collection of rows. TABLE variable types are not new in SQL Server 2008. What s new is that you can now pass a variable of this type as a parameter to a stored procedure or other code module. What That s all that s new Yes, indeed! This seemingly simple change has enormous implications for the code you write, vastly simplifying code whenever you need to pass rows of data to a code module. The parameter is a strongly typed database object with a table schema that you define, with all of the normal benefits of such variables. TVPs are great for passing tabular data around the code modules that make up an application, meeting a need that is surprisingly common in relational databases. Let s take a look at a simple example of creating and using a TVP. You create and use TVPs in five steps:
1 2 3 4 5
Create a table type and define its structure. Declare a code module that accepts a parameter of the table type. Declare a variable of the table type and reference it. Fill the table variable with data. Call the code module, passing the variable to it.
Table-valued parameters to the rescue!
The code for this example is in the Simple.sql file. The first step is to create the table type and define its structure. This is a persistent database object that you can reuse all you want within the database. Here, MyTbl has an integer ID field presumably a primary key and a string field.
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