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NOT FOR REPLICATION TREATMENT OF IDENTITY COLUMNS
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Identity columns have a new default behavior. These columns are automatically marked as Not for Replication (NFR) on the publisher and are transferred with the identity NFR property intact at the subscriber. This retention of the NFR property applies to both transactional and merge replication.
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Undocumented or partially documented changes in behavior
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Why might this be a useful change First, it means that you don t need to wade through all the tables before creating the publication in order to manually set each identity column as NFR. This is a huge improvement because the method used in SQL Server 2000 by Enterprise Manager to set the NFR attribute involved making whole (time-consuming) copies of the table data. It also means that if you are using transactional replication as a disaster recovery solution, there is now one less hoop you will need to jump through on failover because you don t have to change this setting on each table at the subscriber. That particular part of your process can now be removed. (If you are now thinking that it is not possible in T-SQL to directly add the NFR attribute to an existing identity column, please take a look inside the sp_identitycolumnforreplication system stored procedure, because this is the procedure that marks the identity column as NFR.)
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DEFERRED UPDATE TRACE FLAGS
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For transactional replication, you might be using deferred update trace flags unnecessarily. In SQL Server 2000, updates to columns that do not participate in a unique key constraint are replicated as updates to the subscriber unless trace flag 8202 is enabled, after which they are treated as deferred updates (paired insert/deletes). On the other hand, updates to columns that do participate in unique constraints are always treated as deferred updates (paired insert/deletes) unless trace flag 8207 is enabled. In SQL Server 2005, all such changes are replicated as updates on the subscriber regardless of whether the columns being updated participate in a unique constraint or not.
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PARTITIONING OF SNAPSHOT FILES
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The following change to a replication default is more complicated to explain, but it deals with a significant improvement that has been made to the initial snapshot process. In SQL Server 2000, when an article is BCP d to the filesystem (the distribution working folder) during the snapshot generation, there is always one file created that contains the table s data. In SQL Server 2005, when you look in the distribution work-
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Understated changes in SQL Server 2005 replication
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ing folder after creating a snapshot, you might be surprised to find many such files for each article, each containing a separate part of the table data, as shown in figure 2.
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Source table
Articlename#1.bcp
Articlename#2.bcp
Figure 2 Snapshot data from a table is now partitioned across several text files.
Clearly there has been a big change in the processing rules. I ll refer to this overall process of splitting data files as BCP partitioning, borrowing the term from a Microsoft developer who once pointed this out in a posting in the Microsoft Replication Newsgroup (microsoft.public.sqlserver.replication). This section explains why BCP partitioning exists, what the expected behavior is, and how to troubleshoot if it all goes wrong. BCP partitioning has several benefits. First, it helps in those cases where there has been a network outage when the snapshot is being applied to the subscriber. In SQL Server 2000, this would mean that the complete snapshot would have to be reapplied, and in the case of concurrent snapshots, this would all have to be done in one transaction. In contrast, if you have a SQL Server 2005 distributor and SQL Server 2005 subscribers, there is now much greater granularity in the process. The article rows are partitioned into the separate text files, and each partition is applied in a separate transaction, meaning that after an outage, the snapshot distribution is able to continue with the partition where it left off and complete the remaining partitions. For a table containing a lot of rows, this could lead to a huge saving in time. Other useful side effects are that this can cause less expansion of the transaction log (assuming that the migration crosses a backup schedule or the subscriber uses the simple recovery model), and it can lead to paths of parallel execution of the BCP process for those machines having more than one processor. (It is true that parallel execution existed in SQL Server 2000, but this was only for the processing of several articles concurrently and not for a single table.) Similarly, the same benefits apply when creating the initial snapshot using the Snapshot Agent. Note that the BcpBatchSize parameter of the Snapshot and Distribution Agents governs how often progress messages are logged and has no bearing at all on the number of partitions.
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