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FIGURE 49
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Potentiometer clips
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Amphibionics
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5 Turn the servo over so that the top is facing upward Use a screwdriver to force the potentiometer shaft through the hole that it is mounted in, as shown in Figure 410 Pull the potentiometer all the way through and remove any glue holding the wires in place so that it resembles Figure 411
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FIGURE 410
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Push potentiometer through mounting hole
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FIGURE 411
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Potentiometer removed from servo housing
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6 Use a soldering iron to de-solder the three wires that are attached to its leads, as shown in Figure 412 Take note of which wire is attached to the center terminal Either mark the wire or write down the color, as this wire must be connected to the middle lead of the resistor network that will be fabricated in the next step
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FIGURE 412
Potentiometer with wires attached
Amphibionics
7 For this step, you will need two 1/4-watt, 24 K resistors to create a resistor network that will replace the potentiometer that was just removed Try to select two resistors that have very close resistance values, although it is not extremely important, since any discrepancies can be compensated for in the control software Cut the resistor leads to a length of 3/8-inch Twist two of the ends together and solder, as shown in Figure 413
FIGURE 413
Resistor network
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8 Cut three pieces of heat-shrink tubing, and slip each one over each of the wires that were attached to the potentiometer Solder the middle wire from the potentiometer to the two resistor leads that are twisted together Solder the left wire to the left resistor lead, and solder the right wire to the right resistor lead of the resistor network Push the heat-shrink tubing up over the solder connections and shrink into place with a heat source The finished resistor network with the wires soldered and the heat-shrink tubing in place should look like the one in Figure 414 Once this is complete, push the resistor network and the wires back into the servo in the space where the potentiometer was previously
FIGURE 414
Resistor network with wires soldered into place
Amphibionics
9 Take the large output gear and locate the nub on its bottom side Use a pair of side cutters to remove the nub, as shown in Figure 415 Use a file or a sharp knife to remove any excess plastic so that the bottom of the gear where the nub used to be is flat
FIGURE 415
Removing the nub from the output gear
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10 Now that the gear has been modified, make sure that the bottom servo cover is in position Replace the gears in the same order that they were removed from the servo Use Figure 416 as a guide when replacing the gears
FIGURE 416
Servo gear placement
Amphibionics
11 Finally replace the top servo cover and secure it in place with the four screws that were removed during step 2 When the cover and screws are replaced, the servo should resemble the one shown in Figure 417 Be sure to mark the servo, indicating that it has been modified, since it will look exactly the same as an unmodified servo
FIGURE 417
A servo modified for continuous rotation
Controlling a Modified Servo
A modified servo is controlled in the same way as an unmodified servo The only difference is that when the pulse width signal is sent to the servo, it will start turning the motor in the required direction and will continue to rotate as long as the signal is applied Since the potentiometer that keeps track of the output gear position has been removed and replaced with the resistor network, the internal circuitry will think that the motor has not
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reached the specified position and will continue to seek for it in one direction or another With identical resistors in the network, if a pulse with a width of 150 ms is sent to the servo, it will remain motionless Since no two resistors are exactly the same, you may have to experiment with the pulse width value needed for the servo to remain motionless It will probably be within the range of 147 153 ms Figure 418 illustrates how the modified servo will behave when control signals between 100 and 200 ms are applied When a signal with a pulse width of 100 ms is applied to the servo s control line, the servo will move in a counterclockwise direction at full speed The servo speed can be controlled by varying the pulse-width value, with 100 ms being the fastest speed in the counterclockwise direction, and 149 ms being the slowest The same holds true for the servo rotating in
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